How KISSmetrics Grew to 793,858 Visitors a Month by Using One Simple Formula

seo traffic

What if I told you that you can grow a blog to 100,000 plus visitors a month without even blogging.

It sounds crazy, right?

Both the KISSmetrics and Crazy Egg blogs receive well over 100,000 visitors a month each, and I didn’t even have to write one blog post to hit those traffic goals.

Sure, I now blog on both of those properties for fun, but it wasn’t the main source of traffic initially. So, how do you get to 100,000 visitors a month without blogging?

Download this cheat sheet to learn how to grow to 793,858 visitors a month by using one simple formula.

Well, you have to hire writers. Here is the process you should use to find writers who will not only write content but also promote it and make your blog popular. 

Where do you find writers?

I’ve tested out a few places to find writers such as Elance, oDesk, Craigslist, and Problogger. Out of the places I’ve tested, Problogger and Craigslist tend to provide the best writers in that order.

When looking for writers, you have to be very specific. If you aren’t, you will be wasting your time digging through a pile of applicants.

The tricky part about this is that if your job description is too long, people won’t read it, and we’ll just apply. Your goal should be to balance length with specificity.

Here are the main things you need to cover within your job posting:

  • Subject matter – the type of content you want people to produce.
  • Length – business-based posts should be anywhere from 1,500 to 5,000 words depending on your niche. Consumer-facing posts should be fewer than 2,000 words—ideally, under 1,000 words.
  • Tone – do you want your content to sound research-oriented, casual, conversational, etc.? Typically, conversational type of posts perform the best.
  • Examples – send two examples of posts within your industry that you like. If you can’t find any in your industry, find some in any related industry.
  • Purpose – whether you want your content to be humorous or informative, you have to state this to potential writers.

When posting an ad on Problogger or Craigslist, you should consider using an ad similar to this one:

ABC.com is looking for a writer who can talk about sales / crm / motivation in the workplace, business management, increasing revenue, etc.

MUST:

  • Be able to write in a conversational tone
  • Produce informative posts
  • Have personable writing style

Here is an example of two articles with the style of writing we are looking for:

  • example1.com
  • example2.com

We want blog posts written with 1,500-2,000 words.

Please send at least two articles you feel are closest to the writing style we like. If you don’t have any but are certain you can write in that style, send a paragraph within your email using the tone we are looking for 🙂

Once your job postings go live, you’ll receive 100 plus applicants. Just make sure you release the posting on a Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday. Releasing it on a Friday, Saturday, or Sunday will usually result in 15 to 20% fewer applicants.

How do you evaluate writers?

Now that you have a list of applicants, you first want to read their emails. If you notice any grammar or spelling errors within the emails, don’t bother reading their examples. Just cross them off your list.

Why? If they weren’t thorough enough to double-check their emails, they won’t be detail-oriented when creating content for your blog.

For the applicants that have a well-written email, read the first few paragraphs of the examples they included. When reading the first few paragraphs, look for:

  • Conversational tone – the use of the words “you” and “I.”
  • Personality – no one wants to read dry content.
  • Fluff – no one wants to read fluff.
  • Facts – if the writer is making claims, he or she should be linking to sources that back up what the writer is stating.
  • Short paragraphs – ideally, paragraphs should be no longer than 5 or 6 lines.
  • Formatting – if their posts aren’t formatted well, people will have a hard time reading the content.
  • Pictures – each post should start off with an image.

Now that you have narrowed down your list of potentially qualified writers, go back and read the whole blog posts that they linked you to. You should now look for:

  • Subheadings – using them makes content easier to read and skim.
  • Italicizing and bolding – doing these two things to certain words throughout a post makes it easier to read.
  • External links – posts with dozens of relevant external links tend to get shared more on the social web by the website owners you are linking to.
  • Media – pictures, audio, and video are powerful. Not everyone enjoys reading text. If the writer is using media throughout the post, it’s a good sign.
  • Conclusion – wrapping up the post makes it easier for people to digest the information provided.
  • Question – at the end of the post, there should be a question posed to the readers. This will help increase the number of comments generated by your posts.

Most writers won’t meet all of these requirements. But the ones that meet 80% or so are usually going to do a good job.

How much should you pay writers?

If you noticed, I didn’t mention the pay within the job posting. That’s because each writer is willing to work for different amounts.

If your number is too low, you will get little to no applicants. If you price it too high, the quotes you will receive will be too high.

By not including a price, you can ask each writer what they will accept. From there, you can negotiate with them and get their prices down.

Typically, expect to spend $100 to $200 per post. I know that may sound expensive, but good content is. If you are paying less, you’ll see that the quality won’t be as high.

If you are on a budget, consider buying less content until you have a larger budget. But don’t skimp on quality. It’s better to pay for one really good blog post than it is to pay for 10 mediocre posts.

Your first blog post

Now that you have hired your first writer, you’ll want him or her to submit 5 to 10 headline ideas. From there, you can either adjust the headlines or just pick the one that is most appealing to you.

Once you have decided what you’ll want your writer to write about, have the writer create an outline.

The outline should consist of:

  • Introduction – the whole introductory paragraph(s) should be fully written.
  • Body – they should put the main points that will be discussed throughout the body into a bulleted list.
  • Conclusion – the conclusion should end with a question posed to the readers.

If you don’t like the outline or any specific element of it, give the writer feedback and have him or her continually adjust it until you are happy. Once you are happy, you can then have the writer write the post.

Once your writer finishes writing the post, provide more detailed feedback on what you like and dislike.

The whole purpose of this process is to be so picky with the writer that he or she will learn what you like and don’t like. Eventually, the writer will know what you want without much involvement from you.

Images

If the writer has included images, make sure they are screenshots, royalty-free images, or ones that were purchased. In other words, make sure you don’t get sued for using the images.

I’ve been stuck in situations where writers used images that they weren’t supposed to, and we published the content. We later got a legal letter from stock photography sites like Getty Images that not only demanded that we take down the image but pay them for the prior use of the image.

This has cost me thousands of dollars over the years, which is why I am very picky about what images can or can’t be used.

Promotion

As I mentioned in one of the requirements above, the writer should be linking out to sites—dozens, if not over a hundred, to be specific. A good rule of thumb is to add external links only when it makes sense for the reader. Ideally, you should be shooting for 25 external links for every 1,000 words of content you are writing.

I know I don’t follow this rule for Quick Sprout, but it is because the blog is already popular. On my new blog, NeilPatel.com, you’ll notice that I have at least 100 external links per post.

Why?

Because I usually email out each of the sites I linked to with the following email:

Subject: I mentioned [insert their site name] in my latest post

Hey [insert their name],

I just wanted to let you know I am a huge fan of your work. I like it so much that I actually linked to [insert their website] within my latest blog post.

[Insert your blog post URL]

I would be honored if you checked it out. And if you love it, feel free to share it on the social web.

Your fan,

[Insert your name]

By doing this, you’ll gain social shares and eventually build up a large enough audience that can be leveraged to promote future posts.

Conclusion

The process I’ve outlined above works so well that combined, the Crazy Egg and KISSmetrics blogs generated well over a million visitors a month.

Just look at the NeilPatel.com blog. You’ll see how much traffic it has received, which isn’t too bad considering that the blog is fairly new.

So, how else can you grow your blog without having to write content?

 

 

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Comments

  1. Eduardo Cornejo :

    Hey Neil,

    Last post I basically told you that the top site in my niche accepted me to guest-post for him.

    I convinced him that if he’d let me, I could help him optimize his site, and he said yes. He even offered to pay me! I told him that as long as I can write and link to my site, as well as obtain a testimonial from him (like your TechCrunch one in your sidebar), that I don’t need money.

    He keeps insisting though…should I charge him? I don’t want to risk not being able to guest-post or something like that.

    Thanks! 🙂

    • Eduardo, I remember you asking that question.

      You need to do a cost benefit analysis in this case. Is the opportunity to blog and receive links more valuable than him paying you? Maybe you can even get paid and get those links… I would say feel it out.

      • Eduardo Cornejo :

        That’s what I was thinking. For a new blog like mine, to get connected with the largest website from the start is a top priority. In time I can monetize, once my traffic improves.

        In any case, it’s great to know I can obtain some guidance from you. I really appreciate it.:)

      • Junaid Raza :

        Hello Neil,
        I am sure this question is irrelevant. But may I ask you to gimme any example where you were doing Amazon affiliate marketing in your post? I want to go for it for my website. I want to go for a professional way to use link. May I?

      • Hey Neil,

        Since you mentioned links instead of payment, what do price would you usually put on a deep link? $20 off, $50 off, etc.

        Thanks,

        Luke

    • Trevor Gustaveson :

      Eduardo, just wanted to say congrats on getting that offer!

      • Eduardo Cornejo :

        Thanks Trevor!

        Lets just say that being a regular Quick Sprout reader pays way more than you’d think. 😉

        I’m all about fitness and nutrition, but by knowing a bit about website optimization, I managed to “impress” the big site with my blog’s design, and then convince him I could help him do something similar (for a few things in return of course!).

        Not a bad idea!

        • Trevor Gustaveson :

          Yeah, unfortunately I have a horrible case of starting projects and not going far enough with them, so I haven’t seen success yet. Started my new website two days ago, so hopefully that one sees some money if I keep going this time.

          I checked out your website, and it looks awesome! Props!

          • Kousar Batool :

            Best of luck with your new website.

          • Eduardo Cornejo :

            Oh, I understand. I’m a 20 year-old college kid who has done a lot of procrastination in the past, haha. Even so, I believe these projects are worth keeping, so I’ll give it my best with this and won’t stop.

            We are starting at the same time basically, so let’s just keep at it! 🙂

            Good luck and thanks for the compliments!

            • Hey, I’m a 21 year old colege kid too! And ai’ve got the same problem! I’ve started multiple websites in the past and they even showed a lot of promise and potential but I failed to follow through due to procrastination!
              What are you doing differently this time to make sure it doesn’t happen again? Any tips for me?

              • Eduardo Cornejo :

                Hey Ankit,

                I would just say, simply don’t stop. Specially if you see the potential, just keep moving forward.

                Imagine where those projects would have been by now, you know?

                I know it sounds simple and that it’s actually quite hard, but that’s really the main issue.

                Don’t let YOU beat YOU down. 🙂

                Let’s all do our best!

              • Hey Ankit, I thought I’d put in a quick reply on procrastination.
                Firstly, when you are 20/21 years old it’s fine to not win at everything- it’s s good time to try lots of stuff out. Anyway,
                I’ve done my fair share of plotting and planning then not carrying through- because I didn’t know why I was really doing it, or how I’d get to the end goal, plus I was working on too many things with eyes bigger than my mouth…
                If you can clearly define why you are want to create a project, (goal setting) Then be very realistic about how you will get there… What does it really take? What will it look like in end? How much time and effort are involved in continual operation ? You will narrow down all your ideas to the ones you actually want to work on before you jump in blindly. Which is what leads to procrastination – you lose sight of the “why”.
                Often a raw idea needs months of development to figure out if/how it’s possible to achieve.
                Are you starting too big? Plan out baby steps on projects you love and you won’t catch yourself procrastinating. Know the next step at every point.
                Good luck!

    • Matt Auckland :

      Awesome Eduardo, well done. That’s a big win for sure.

      My goal in consuming Neil’s posts and tips, is to create a business from the new Digital Broadcast Media (Internet Radio, just a better term for it!) project I’m launching.

      I’m pooling all my skills and knowledge from 20yrs+ in web development and I.T, plus 12yrs+ in professional FM broadcasting, to build a brand in a niche music genre I love.

      Using this knowledge I aim to optimise the website I’m developing, to attract listeners and readers to the station. Turning them into loyal patrons and hopefully, revenue.

      Not easy to create a viable business in internet radio, but that’s a challenge I’ll will take on.

  2. Great post!

    One mistake I’ve noticed many people making when hiring writers, particularly at the lower end of the price scale, is that they do not clearly spell out what exactly they want from the writer. This results in guesswork from the writer and often taking the path of least resistance, which generally produces poor quality.

    So my simple rule is – don’t assume writers are mind readers! Clearly define what you want, what you expect from them and also manage your own expectations appropriately (particularly with respect to price/quality).

    • Rob,
      Thanks for those additional insights. A lot of times people who hire writers get lazy. If you want them to do a great job you have to be concise — you also have to be willing to be a little hands on at first until they get the hang of things.

      Looking forward to hearing much more from you.

      • Anil Agarwal :

        Neil,

        I absolutely love KISSMetrics blog. Not only the tools that are helpful but every piece of content that gets published on the blog is truly epic.

        You add amazing value to the products and websites you create. Glad I finally found the case study.

  3. Dan Creviston :

    Neil,

    Wouldn’t 25 links per 1,000 words seem a bit too much? And would it essentially drive people away from your post? Perhaps that is a topic of another discussion, probably one you have already written about 🙂

    I’ve been thinking of finding a niche and paying someone to write for me. I just do not have the time to do it myself, but I’d like to experiment online marketing techniques to grow an email subscriber list. I just need a product, which would be the content starting out.

    I’m an avid reader of your blogs.
    Until next time,
    Dan

    • Dan, the formula can be tweaked depending on the niche and how valuable the links are. It’s all about context and content at the end of the day. Looking forward to hearing much more from you.

  4. Steve Estimable :

    Neil, great post on growing your monthly visitors.

    I like the way you outlined the process it is pretty clear and concise. We something complicated that can be as simple you presented them.

    My key point on this post is “25 external links for every 1,000 words of content you are writing.”

    Steve Q: Would you hire writers with a website under your name while being a consultant?

    Neil Q: So, how else can you grow your blog without having to write content?

    Steve A: Lately, i would say by producing a podcast show since it is trending, include, edit and treat the audio transcription as a rich media blog post.

    Have a growing day!

    • Eduardo Cornejo :

      Hey Steve,

      Although that idea probably won’t work for my fitness blog, it sounds like a great strategy!

      • Steve Estimable :

        Eduardo, i visited your website.

        It can certainly work for you!

        Reverse engineer these podcast: The 19 Best Health and Fitness Podcasts of All Time (So Far)

        The Link: http://greatist.com/discover/best-health-fitness-podcasts

        Since your website is in Spanish, you already have a difference advantage for a specific market.

        Have a great day, give it a try!

        • Eduardo Cornejo :

          This is very valuable information!

          I am definitely taking it step by step, with blogging coming first, but I will add this to my content ideas list right away.

          It’s funny, I started this site in English and had 11 good posts on a totally different URL, but realized there was so much info about it in English and very little in Spanish, I started it all over again.

          It’s definitely worth it though, as I have many advantages. This being one. 🙂

          Thank you!

    • Steve, I love how you answer the questions so I don’t have to. Thanks for these great gems and insights. Looking forward to hearing much more from you.

  5. William Zimmerman :

    Neil,

    Great article!!

    How do you feel about hiring interns to write? Maybe English majors for example?

    Thanks very much! You are the man!

    All the Best,
    Bill Zimm

  6. I love how specific you were with the process in this post. I’ve had trouble finding writers who can help me accomplish my goals. Looks like part of the problem was the way I hire and manage writers.

    This might be the most valuable post I’ve read on Quicksprout ever, in fact. I’m going to be sharing this one.

    • Randy, glad I could help. If you have any additional feedback or tips I would love to hear them.

  7. Stephen Esketzis :

    This article is what 99% of SAAS companies need to start reading and handballing to their marketing team so they have a real content marketing strategy.

    Essentially $150/week on a solid A+ blog post. 52 Posts a year @ $7,800 USD.

    If those 50+ posts can make that ROI, your systems broken.

    Great post Neil,
    Stephen

    • Stephen, I like how you broke it down into the numbers. I agree ( I think you meant to say “can’t”)

      Looking forward to hearing much more from you.

  8. Adarsh Sojitra :

    Structure of the Article matters a lot! I got good reactions and got good benefit when i started writing like you told which is,

  9. Adarsh Sojitra :

    Structure of the Article matters a lot! I got good reactions and got good benefit when i started writing like you told which is,

    Introduction
    Body
    conclusion

    .
    Yes, you are right, We should not go for money but we should go for Good content if we are hiring content writers.
    THanks for this post Sir..

    • Adarsh, that structure hasn’t failed anyone since grade school 😉

      It’s just a great way to convey information and tell a story.

  10. Keith Bresee :

    Hey Neil!

    I love this promotion strategy! I got great results in my first post with it!

    My rule of thumb is to send out 150 – 200 emails for every post. It seems to work really for me, and a lot of the promotion techniques I’ve learned from you so thank you! 🙂

    Be awesome!
    Keith

    • Keith, glad I could help. It’s been a pretty sound strategy for me thus far. If you have any other insights please share them. Looking forward to hearing much more from you.

  11. Pardeep Goyal :

    I read article from other side of table, how to get hired as content writer 🙂

    Thanks for sharing tips, I will do my best to be worthy of price that client is willing to pay.

    One question is from your previous post on facebook marketing – How to get shout for shout likes on facebook page. I tried but it seems not working. Not even 5%. I am still at 3000 – 4000 likes range on my page.

    Can you please share sample messages for shout out?

    • Pardeep, glad I could help.

      As for your shout question — perhaps you need to work on the specific messaging?

      • Pardeep Goyal :

        A sample would give better understanding of articulating message.

        Here is my facebook page – facebook.com/moneysparkle

        I am writing on personal blog, how my message should look like?

  12. Neil, if you hire a writer to write for $100 (an example), do you expect them to sign some sort of legal agreement to release the content rights? Also, a good writer may not be good at selecting pictures? How do you manage that?

    • Sal, typically it’s contract work so there aren’t any agreements made of that sort unless they want them.

      You shouldn’t select a writer who can’t do it all or find a means to doing it all.

  13. Neon Emmanuel :

    Hireing writers is no bad ideal, personally I hired a freelancer who manages the forum section of my blog, and had promoted it seriously.

    Neil, You remember me of how I started blogging.

    In one of my old blogs, that I sold.

    Yea, that same trick, get the writers, get them share content they write, they redirect people to content they have written , you get extra readers, you get the returning the readers.

    Nice one.
    Hiring a writer isn’t a waste of fund after all.

    • Neon, sounds like you have the right strategy and you have it down. Keep up the great work. I look forward to hearing much more from you.

  14. Toni @ Debt Free Divas :

    This was helpful from the standpoint of applying for freelance jobs. Thank you!

  15. Hi Neil thankyou fr great post you are awesome I will blog about you on my blog http://www.startupinstructions.com if you don’t plus can I also make a user of your name nd copy these blogs nd post it there?
    Thanks

    • Sam, I am not sure what you are asking. You shouldn’t copy other blog posts — if that’s what you are asking.

  16. Neil,

    This article is pure gold for me as I am in the process of hiring freelance bloggers for our new blog for Saas product. Have you tried hiring from GrowthGeeks?

    Let me ask you this, if we were gunning to achieve 60k Uniques/month by end of Month 5 and we are doing our best to publish best relevant content (lots of research, best practices, readers feedback) and promoting it well too:

    a) How many blog posts per week should we be looking to publish?

    b) If budget was not a major issue, would it better to publish more high quality blog posts e.g 10/week? or that kind of quantity could overwhelm the readers?

    c)60k uniques/month within 5 months, is that even healthy? or achievable? Given that we are looking for quality traffic which we aim to convert into buyers.

    Many thanks

    H

    • Hammad, sounds like a great strategy. I haven’t used GrowthGweeks.

      a. 2-3
      b. I would also goes with high quality
      c. It’s definitely achievable. The content will speak for itself in this regard.

  17. Neil,
    The best part is you make it sound so..simple.
    Am going to implement some of the ideas,on my blog.
    Very helpful tips.Thanks a ton.

  18. Harshit Sharma :

    Hey Neil,
    As you mentioned, the price is quite expensive. But you’re claiming good results, so will try in future. Really thanks for the email template, it will be generating much good results. Will use it with my old blog posts.

    • Harshit, glad I could help. I think you’ll find great results if you narrow down your search for good writers.

  19. Palash Kumar Daw :

    Already hired a writer for my blog. I only tell about the topic and targeted visitors.

  20. Lilia @ Big Mailer :

    What a GREAT post with practical and actionable advice, thank you for sharing Neil!

    This is one of the most helpful posts to be bookmarked, shared, and referred to over and over. Can’t wait to try out these techniques.

    Thank you, thank you.

  21. Enstine Muki :

    Excellent content Neil and this is really targeted t o my new project which is a job board for bloggers BlogExpose.com – a platform where companies find bloggers to hire.

    thanks for providing these tips

  22. Paul Melinte :

    Hi, Neil! I noticed that your external links does not automatically open in another window. I thought it is better that those links to open in a new window. What is the reason for which you chose to let them open in the same window?

    • Paul, I like to keep people on the page — rather than having them leave to a new window. It’s just how I’ve always done it.

  23. Karsten Fink :

    love the way how you reach out to people.

  24. Thank you for giving me permission to do this. In March, I hired by very first writer. He’s amazing! I found him through a connection service that helps people like me connect with good freelancers (the freelancers pay money to be a part of this service, so you always find quality people – http://www.carefulcents.com/client-connection/, if anyone is interested.)

    I also found a graphic designer through Twitter just by putting a tweet out with the right keywords. There are people out there looking for work.

    I work with these guys in Asana. I put together a quick series of tutorial videos on how to add content to wordpress, how to add graphics, links, and affiliate stuff using ScreenFlow for Mac. Took all of about 2 hours to put together and they have access to this library within Asana. I also now have it for future workers.

    I pay $1,000 a month to get 8 well-crafted articles written with custom illustrated images in 3 sizes (Rectangle, Square and Pinterest).

    Everything is scheduled through Asana, and these guys work together on the images. I’m in love with this system and it’s been growing my traffic and getting me sponsorship clients.

    I have a question though. This site I’m paying for makes enough money to cover the costs. However, I have some brand new sites I’d like to do this on, but they don’t make money yet.

    When is it time to spend some money and invest in a project? Is it ever ok? Neil, would you do something like this?

    Thanks again!

    • I would definitely reallocate resources to a new project if I thought it had potential. That’s the essence of investing — to make more money 😉

      Let me know if you need any help along the way.

  25. Thank you for this– it got me to finally do what I’ve been meaning to do for a long time and I really appreciate it!

  26. Hey Neil, nice post.
    If you want to become a famous blogger than healthy and rich content is the biggest need of blog.

  27. Great post about SEO and the powers of targeting people who are interested in what you have to say/review/offer! Quality content writers and creaters will be a thing of the future without question!

  28. ommy panchal :

    its all about the genuine and quality content that we post at the site and the domain authority of website.

  29. Hi Neil,
    Excellent post Neil. It’s simply an Ultimate guide to hire content writers. I would like to know how much you pay to the content writers nowadays?

    • MS, it depends it can be anywhere from upwards of $1000s depending on the project.

      • Thanks for leaving your reply. $1000 or above is humongous for me, but hopefully I will try to reach that stage where it looks reasonable i.e. where you are. 😀

        MS Qureshi

  30. Cliff Wachtel :

    Neil,
    You recommend $100-200 per post, guess there’s some variation if is 1k or 5k word post, complexity, research involved, etc.

    However you also mention asking for list of ideas and outlines. Are those somehow paid for separately, after all, these too take time, possibly lots of time.

    Or do you expect the writers to put in this unpaid time as part of that $100-200 fee per post?

    I could see that if the overall project is at least $2-3k but would think you’d pay separately for the ideas and outlines on smaller jobs.

    Am I right? Your thoughts?

    Am I wrong?

    • Cliff, It’s actually a one time cost. Most writers already have sample templates ready because they reach out on the daily. I am paying for the final product.

  31. Dr. Muddassir Ahmed :

    Hi Neil,

    Another great post and you are absolutely making perfect sense here (again!). And that is why I have Started Kreative Krowd (kreativekrowd.com) a crowdsourcing market place to hire creative freelancers. Our Mission is to create a platform which is Functional, Familiar, Fast, Fun to work, a provide Feel good experience with excellent customer service and give Fame and Fortune to be Kreative on our platform.

    What I have to do, to get a blog mentioned from you. Please guide!

    • Dr. Muddassir, sounds like a great portal. Maybe somewhere down the line when there is context I’ll throw you a plug 😉

  32. Neil,

    Another great post, thanks. On my new site, I was thinking of curating posts, probably 1-2 a week to get my site started and driving traffic to it.

    What is you opinion on curating posts?
    Here is a good reference about it:
    http://www.curata.com/blog/the-definitive-guide-to-content-curation/

  33. Mike Markarian :

    Neil, what types of photos have gotten you in trouble in the past? Strictly people taking stock photography and not paying (without you knowing)? Or other photos too? Thanks!

    • Mike, I have always made sure not to get in trouble — but I have seen people get in trouble for taking photos from google images without attribution.

  34. Hello Neil. My name is Dan and I am a founder of Self Employment Ideas website.
    Many thanks for this very inspiring and informative article. It’s a great value and a perfect example for bloggers and myself to look for the new fresh ideas and ways to promote the content and get more traffic.
    You are welcome to visit my website for more opportunities online >> http://www.selfemploymentideas365.com Self Employment Ideas – From Opportunities & Challengers to Prosperity.
    Cheers and have a nice day!

    • Dan, thanks for sharing — Please keep everything in context to the post next time so you don’t get marked as spam.

      Glad you found the post helpful.

  35. Hi Neil,

    Thank you for your information. Your posts are always great. I’ve just published http://www.beneficiosdelajo.com I’m very happy with the results, the visits growth is unbelievable.

    Thanks and have a nice day!

  36. Neil,

    I’m a writer, and I totally agree with you: quality over quantity counts in the long run. Too often I see “content mills” churning out poorly written “content” that does little to inform, engage, or persuade the audience. I’m obviously biased, but when you’re paying $5 for a 500-word blog post, do you REALLY expect to have a quality piece of writing?

    As the old saying goes, “you get what you pay for.”

    • Mike, definitely. There used to be a ton of services that provided cheap results like that. The game has definitely changed.

  37. Another amazing post!

    Neil, who does the outreach? Do you hire a low-cost worker (perhaps from Asia) to do the outreach or does the blogger himself does the outreach?

    Bloggers usually don’t want that somebody else writes under their name. So it’s somehow weird if another person than the author of the article contacts our blogger.

    On the other side it takes a lot of time to contact 25 people every article.

    • Ulf, I actually do the outreach myself to make sure I am conveying the right information and filtering to find the best writers.

  38. Hi Neil,
    I have two questions in my mind.

    1. How do you check the genuineness of the content, means whether it is original or any spun content – apart from checking it in copyscape.

    2. How do you check whether the images are royalty free or not.

    • Minesh

      1. I either google a portion of the text to see if it’s spun or duplicate or use a service like copyscape
      2. You need to get them from stock image sites or from the artists themselves.

  39. Hi Neal thanks ..great piece! I have a question: I like pictures you use in your nutrition blog. Where do you take them? Thanks.

  40. Another great post Neil. We’re in Latin America, and we’ve always found that hiring fulltime writers is the toughest thing. Schools just don’t teach writing down there.

    The biggest epiphany for us was to set up the recruiting process in such a way that you can cast a wide net, and throw out 95% of candidates without a second glance.

    We do targetted facebook and linkedin ads that lead to a sales page that does a takeaway sale for the position, and gives very precise instructions for application. For example, we’ll tell them to send a sample with instructions like “Size 11, Times New Roman font, exactly 300-400 words” and “send with the email subject ‘Writer-Application-El Salvador’.

    My assistant can then just toss all the applications that don’t follow instructions or have obvious grammar mistakes (lack attention to detail is the biggest reason new employees fail, anyway), and from 200 applications, I only see 10, then interview 3 or 4, and usually get one good person. Expensive in ads, but cheaper in time.

    • Pete, sounds like a great and innovative strategy — I bet it saves a lot of time. Thanks for sharing.

    • Hi Pete,

      I hire in Latin America as well, with similar problems.

      What I can add:

      -Let them do a typing speed test (for checking if they are internet savvy)
      -Give them a topic and let them write a headline (Latin American people aren’t good headline writers, mainly too fancy…)
      -hire always full time and hire people who are looking for a full time job instead of “freelancers”

      If you want to exchange some information, add me to Skype, please: ulf.kuhn@googlemail.com

      Ulf

  41. This is insightful content Neil. Very easy to scale something like this.

  42. Chad Rucker :

    Start with headlines. That’s the way to go, Neil, and you nailed it. I’ve been freelancing for years (and still working full-time in the agency life) and if I’m hiring a copywriter, I want 5 great headlines, yes, but I want to time them fast (to make sure THEY are writing them and not someone else).

    Here’s how to do it:

    Ask them (via email or phone) if they have 15 minutes on hand. If “yes,” then give them a topic and ask them to write 5 great headlines in 15 minutes. This weeds out the pretenders (and the lazy writers). And yes, someone can Google the info really fast, but you’d be surprised at the frighteningly horrendous headlines that come back. When you get a great one, do not leave that writer. Give them what they want.

    Thanks again, Neil!

    • Chad, love your process. To be honest is really is all about the headlines. Thanks for sharing and keep up the great work.

  43. Neil, I am a regular reader of your blog, I learned and still learning lots of things from Quicksprout. Another great article from you and I really like the formula. The formula looks simple and it takes some time to implement. Let me do for my blog.

    Thanks for sharing!

  44. Ghayoor Shaikh :

    Neil,
    I am very big fan of your postings. Please let me know the more tips to increase my SEO Campaign…..

  45. “Typically, expect to spend $100 to $200 per post. I know that may sound expensive, but good content is. If you are paying less, you’ll see that the quality won’t be as high.”

    No way is that too high.

    Like most people reading here, I’ve tried taking the $5 to $15 per post route in the past and never got anything that made a big difference to my blogs.

    If your site has its own style, you should be ready to pay a good writer to learn the voice of the blog and write in its style.

    When I look at what some of the top-generating posts have generated in terms of SEO traffic, I’d galdly pay a writer 200 bones to write a 1500-word piece on a subject they can afford to spend time learning, should it not be their specialty.

    $200 is a lot cheaper for a piece that will generate dozens to hundreds of organic visits per day for a long time, than paying $15 per post for one-shot waters with no ROI.

    • John, I started off early in the game paying much less but the quality was horrible. It’s all about paying the right wage to get the best results.

  46. David Throop :

    Neil,
    It shouldn’t be a surprise to anyone that reads your posts why you’re as great as you are.

    Like others, I read this post thinking about my own experiences as a freelance writer.

    There are a couple issues that this article kept echoing in my head. Too often I notice that many offer a low pay rate with nearly exacting detail for what they expect.

    This behavior is contradictory to the hiring guidelines that they post. Clients that post low-pay, high-expectation jobs often don’t communicate their expectations well. Even with a tete-a-tete between the two parties, it doesn’t result in clear expectations for the writer.

    What your post does, is make it clear for both the client and the writer to have more clear guidelines and expectations for both parties.

    Thanks for sharing.

    • David, thanks for reading and sharing these insightful thoughts. Looking forward to hearing much more from you.

  47. Carti de vizita :

    Hy Neil! I`m glad to read your article again! Another verry exciting information. ThX!

  48. Ivailo Durmonski :

    Really great post Neil!

    Are you using other authors now, or are you writing all articles by yourself?

  49. Peeyush Rajput :

    I wish that my blog also reach those counts a month.Kissmetrics is another amazing creation from you and thanks a lot for this article

  50. Hunter Willis :

    Neil,

    Great article today – I found it to be very valuable. One thing I’ve added to my outsourced programming project requirements is a line like, “In your reply back to me please say “I’ve read your instructions and will let you know if I have any questions.””

    This approach allows me to quickly screen candidates who didn’t read the requirements. Usually 50-75% of the responses DON’T have that line it.

    Finally, I’ve used Writer Access numerous times and I’ve been very happy with the results. I’m not sure if you’ve used them or not but the candidates are pre-screened and their writing level already graded. Plus the pricing is transparent so you know precisely what you’ll pay when you put in the order.

    Have a great day!

    -Hunter

    • Hunter — that’s a great strategy that I’ll have to look into utilizing. Thanks for the insights and for reading.

  51. Craig Lillard :

    Hey Neil,

    So, you should include several links in the blog out to other sites? Should the outbound links be nofollow or dofollow? Does it matter anymore?

    Thanks! – Craig

  52. Julie Syl Kalungi :

    Law of attraction at work here…Just what I need To free my time to do some projects I want to accomplish this side of the year. I am now armed with the kit to hire a writer and keep my blog running while I get things done. Talking of writing to the influencers, I have written to you before as a fan and having linked to a blog post you did…wont say what the result was 🙂

    As always Thanks Neil!

  53. Sometimes I feel like you’ve been secretly watching me and making posts to help me with whatever I’m stuck on.

    This guide couldn’t have been timed better, as I’m just in the process of hiring writers but wasn’t sure of the best place or what budget to set.

    I’m in the health niche, and I find good health writers are difficult to find and usually demand higher pay. Someone having both knowledge in health and nutrition AND writing skill is a rare find.

  54. Hi guys,

    Talking about external links within the post, I have a doubt about follow & nofollow.

    Which one you recomend to use for external links?? Some people recomend index/nofollow and other index/follow…….and I have no idea which method is better.

    Someone can solve my question??

    Thanks !!!!

  55. Emily Brown :

    I love the idea on how you thoroughly explain and discuss on how to hire a freelance writer. But, if you think about it you’re title is somewhat misleading to your blog post. Like you discuss almost 80% on how to hire a writer; what to write and where to hire the best of them; and you only discuss nearly 15% on how Crazy Egg and KISSmetrics blogs generated and drive over a million visitors a month? And if I were to conclude, what you’re trying to say is that the one simple formula is to hire “The best Writer” and “Write the best articles” and share it to the world.

    I’d be better if you explain more on why choose those personalities or individuals you mention on your articles; and why mentioning them help you drive more traffic to your blog.

    • Emily, glad I could help. Your suggestion would be a good idea for a future posts — let me see what I can do.

  56. mukesh jangir :

    Thanks neil for support,
    my basic problem is i am not able to attract traffic to my site http://www.gizmorealm.com
    and i have written more than 2500 posts till now but still no traffic recently there was some crawling movemet in my fb page but still not good enough.
    Please tell me how can i increase my readers audience for ummmm free

    • Mukesh, it is probably the quality of your content that needs help — you should also focus on reaching out to your niche through the right channels. It makes all the difference.

  57. mukesh jangir :

    And one more thing sir i am not able to submit my xml sitemap because sitemap is generated for http://www.gizmorealm.com but google webmaster tooll shows http://www.gizmorealm.blogspot.com and he is rejecting my sitemap
    any ideas how could i solve this one

  58. Rachel Flores :

    Hey Neil, Great article..!!
    I just wanna say, quality of content matters a lot like no grammatical mistakes, rich and informational content because no one wants to read rubbish articles..!!
    Thanks for sharing this wonderful article..!!

  59. So timely Neil! Thanks man! What cities do you usually post your craigslist ads in?

    • Chris, it depends on what I am looking for. Usually large cities as they tend to attract the most talent.

  60. Wow, this has been one of the most valuable posts i have EVER read. The extra steps that others forget (like liking and notifying the linked to site) is what makes yhe difference.

    Thanks for sharing Neil

  61. Neil,

    “Length – business-based posts should be anywhere from 1,500 to 5,000 words depending on your niche. Consumer-facing posts should be fewer than 2,000 words—ideally, under 1,000 words.”

    This post is business based? I presume your nutrition blog is considered Consumer facing?

    JP.

  62. Naiyer Jawaid :

    Neil;

    I’m a great fan of you, and have learned a lot from these posts.

    Keep it up.

    NJ

  63. Apologies I missed this bit,

    I guess you suggest less than 1000 for Consumers for an attention span reason? But doesn’t Google now hold longer word count posts in higher esteem?

    JP.

    • JP, it does — however, sometimes you can get away with shorter content if it’s just news related or if you are sharing snippets.

  64. Harekrishna :

    The simple formula of KISSmetrics to grow up to 793,858 visitors a month is amazing. A writer can do anything. A writer can play a vital role to gain internet traffic.

  65. Martyna Bizdra :

    Hey Neil

    Thank you for an interesting post.
    I am beginning a project related to the sports psychology, and will hire a writer to create the articles (for now). Your idea about the promotion is brilliant.

    Thank you 🙂
    Martyna

  66. Martyna Bizdra :

    Neil

    There is a different way to promote a site / project as well.
    Three years ago, together with a team, we created a sports festival. It took as four months to prepare everything, but in the end, our website needed about a month (or two, I am not sure about it now) to jump from the n/a to 3 in terms of page rank. It happened also because some of the major sports magazines (like men’s health) linked to our site, and published articles about us.

    Best wishes
    Martyna

  67. Hey Neil!
    Your article appeal me so much. I have a very new blog. And only thing bothers me is traffic. I will try to follow all the above-mentioned tips, but hiring a writer is very tough to me right now. As I am a novice and have no budget. I am hardly getting any traffic. I don’t know if you can help me in this. Because by following your articles I emailed few of blog writers to get me a backlink but got no response. That’s may be Because I have no reputation like you. Please let me know if you know any better ideas to get blog traffic as you are very proficient in the field and I have no contacts all around to seek hello from.

    Nice article anyway!

  68. Wojciech Szywalski :

    Hi Neil,
    Thanks for sharing your story with us. One question. There is a cover image to your blog with SEO portion visible on the top of the bars. I bet it’s been chosen on purpose to say that SEO stays on the top of the each content marketing activity, or I am over-interpreting this message? 🙂

    Coming back to the article. Hiring freelance writers is very challenging and I hope this article I am linking to will correspond to what you’ve written. Here is a link to the article saying how to hire a freelance writer http://blog.presspadapp.com/how-to-hire-a-freelance-writer-the-myths-and-truths/ Hope that you do not mind if I’ll left this link here?

  69. Ryan Biddulph :

    Hi Neil,

    It always pays to pay someone to do a job you don’t want to do, or you wish someone else to do 😉 Freelancers abound, and good ones too, so pay up and rake in that traffic. John Chow does this as well, as he writes, but has a staff which churns out content regularly.

    Ryan

  70. Sushma Arora :

    Wonderful depiction. I will follow them. Thanks!

  71. Moumita Ghosh :

    Hello Neil Sir,

    Get traffic without blogging is really an awesome idea. I have read this post 3 times and try to store in my mind the every process. I always focus on quality instead of quantity. A quality blog post can bring massive traffic to a blog. I will keep in my mind the process what you have said to hire a content writer. All processes are really interesting in this article.

    Thanks & regards,

    Moumita Ghosh

    • Moumita, awesome! It’s all about the process — let me know if you need any help with anything else.

  72. Hello Neil,
    It is Very Interesting Informative Article , Most Popular The simple formula of KISSmetrics to grow up to 793,858 visitors a month is amazing.Traffic ideas Good Work Thanks a lot For Sharing ,
    Have a Rock Day ahead

    • Harleena, thanks for sharing your insights and feedback. Looking forward to hearing much more from you.

  73. Andre Hospidales :

    I think it also depends on who you are writing for. If you are writing for consumers, I don’t think the articles need to be that expensive. Most cosumers scan, rather than read the entire articles, and you can get away with less than perfect articles as long as you have a message that resonates with your audience. Of course, this is completely different from writing for the B2B field.

    • Andre, great point. You have to look at context — some articles require less leg work and actual writing.

  74. Hi Neil,
    As you said, conversational tone works best. But I often wonder, whether it is better to address readers saying :
    – “you” (they feel we’re talking to them directly)
    – or “we” (they might feel more connected with the writter)

    Thank you for your great articles!

    • Buzut, great point. I think it depends on context — both can be used depending on the situation.

      • Thank you for answering that fast! I’ll try to alternate so that it feels natural.

        Beside, if I may, you should add a function to mail commenters when one of their comments receive a reply. That would engage the conversation even more!

  75. Hey Neil,

    This is a really great article, very out of the box for startup blogs. Thank you. My question, though, is more specific to the external linking for SEO and social share pushes. How much time do you recommend for the different stages of blogging? Free writing first draft, editing, image hunting and link building (25-100 links even) and sending emails to every link owner could easily be a 4-5 hour project.

    Is this a legitimate model, or am I missing something? Thank you Neil. I love your work.

    jeff

    • Jeff, it’s a great model if you have the time. If you do not then I would suggest compartmentalizing it all and getting an intern to do a lot of the outreach and promotion on social.

  76. Great tips Neil. About 1 year ago I hired off elance for some articles. I ended up paying about $25 an article. I gave them a template (the headings) and all they needed to do was fill in. It seriously took me 15 minutes per article to make it post-able. The lesson I learned is you get what you pay for. You mention $100-$200 and I think that is a good price range for quality. The people that cost that much actually take pride in their writing and it will show. I’m going to try again to hire using some of these tips.

    • Bosch, that’s a good point — you always get what you pay for. Thanks for sharing your story.

  77. First of all thanks for this post. You always write influencial content which are lucid and easily understandable but I am not able to execute them properly because of time consuming and frustration which overcome me. Do you have some strategies so that I can increase my traffic without getting frustrated?

    • Vincent Cuibus :

      I know this question isn’t addressed to me but I just wanted to help you out.

      If you would like to focus more on your productivity, “rescuetime” is the best tool out there. It comes with a 14 day free trial.

      Neil even wrote them a testimonial 🙂

    • Neeraj, to be honest you just have to keep at it — it can be frustrating at times but it will all be rewarding in the end.

  78. This is quite interesting article, I am spending $20 – $30 for each post. This is not enough to get the quality post. The writers are not caring about the conversion. All I need to do is to hire a better writer, I may use your ideas to get a perfect writer. Thanks for sharing these valuable information Neil.

    • Vincent Cuibus :

      John, I would be more than happy to help you out with your content.

      I have some free time in the next couple of weeks so feel free to contact me anytime.

    • John, let me know how it works out. I look forward to seeing you progress and success.

  79. Vincent Cuibus :

    This masterpiece is what I was looking for!

    Awesome as always, thanks!

  80. Karsten Fink :

    Neil,

    your posts are awesome as always and I find myself here more and more.

    I thought I’d ask for your advice in this matter.

    When you reply to a post (how do you decide if you do or not?)
    you put certain effort into it. Now hiring writers is not always possible, especially for startups with a lesser budget (let’s call it that way, you know what I mean.) Now they have to write the articles themselves. You always hear: you have to sweat to make it happen, so you sweat for your posts, articles or whatever. But in some way of a kind you don’t actually sweat if you’re a real blogger, someone who has got a story to tell.

    Now to the question: What is your advice for that kind? Is it worth the sweating? Or is it really necessary (in the first place)?
    Would appreciate any comment of yours.

    • Karsten, great question. By sweat I assume you mean worry or stress about?

      IF that’s the case I just go with my intuition. I have gotten burned before by hiring writers who didn’t do a great job after they provided a great interview and sample. It’s all about getting a feel for great writers.

  81. Keyur Patel :

    Hii neil patel

    I am a SEO executive and 1 year Exp. I am working on my company’s site. Website have a good quality and Unique content + 100% responsive, But site Alexa rank is too low. I am doing all the On-page and Off-page Activities but i didn’t get result.

    Please give me some Suggestion for that

    My website is trimantra.com

    • Keyur, I just checked out your site and you should focus more on the content you are providing. Make sure the headlines and content is unique and thought provoking. Also, work on the site design and see what works best through a/b testing.

  82. Hey Neil,

    Would I be right in saying that content marketing does not work so effectively for ALL niches?

    Take the accounting software niche for example. Most of the competitors in this area (QuickBooks, Freshbooks, Xero, LessAccounting, Sage) seem to get customers more from word of mouth rather than through useful content.

    When it comes to online marketing however, there is a wealth of content opportunities since marketers are always looking to read more stuff on marketing and how to make their marketing better. That’s why content marketing for turned out to be so successful for KISSmetrics, and other sites like CrazyEgg and Hubspot as well.

    Would love to know your insights on this. 🙂

    • Vikram, I would disagree. I think with enough creativity you could create content pieces that resonate with your target audience — it’s all about context, content and finding the right niche.

  83. Sumit Sharma :

    IT’s typical Neil Strategy to target long tail keywords that will dominate your traffic for long term and you will get visitors without even blogging for an year or so.

  84. Neil,

    My experience as a freelancer and coming into contact with your operation (from problogger) was a bit different.

    Everyone was very polite (very nice), but, I was told standard pay was 7 cents a word (but that they would go up to 10 cents a word), that you had to send your bank information, and that it could take over a month to get paid.

    At the time, I did not realize it was even your people….But, looking back through the email chain, you were cc’d in the chain.

    I chose not to sign up, but, I am sad about it…I am a big fan!

    Josh H

  85. Great post, Neil! We have used a similar strategy on our end and have gotten stellar results. We tested similar content sources and wound up using Content Calvary given that they can do the writing, uploading, scheduling, and legal image sourcing. Wanted to just called out given that it may help some of your readers.

  86. Seo Powerlink :

    “793,858 Visitors a Month by Using One Simple Formula”, yes it is possible and you showed it already. I just want to say that who says that seo is dead they should read this article.

  87. Zoeller Wayne :

    Awesome advice for anyone starting blogging. I recently read a piece on advertising secrets from the kirby vacuum company, they had some great insight into what motivates others and calls to action..

  88. Great article thanks!. I´m now prompting http://www.liberlandia.es

  89. I am working on http://www.triaddisplays.com and your advice is already helping.

  90. Thanks for the article! I’m actually going to follow through your process and see how I go with hiring a blogger. A question, do you use the blogger’s name on the published post (so full attribution) or would you usually use the writer as more a ghost writer and use your own name instead?

  91. Hey Neil,

    What a great post! It’s one of the best I’ve read in a while. I really like your tip about external links and then messaging the website to let them know and share if they like the post. I think that one tip alone is going to make a massive improvement to my traffic.

    Thanks 🙂
    Alan

  92. Venkat Dinavahi :

    Hi Neil,

    This post came a critical moment for me. Can’t thank you enough! I’m not a writer so it has been a struggle to start writing posts. Will give finding a writer on problogger a shot.

    To overcome my resistance to writing, I have recently started writing a headline, then recording into Evernote. My thoughts flow much better and I will ramble on a topic for 10-30 minutes.

    I hope there are writers out there that can turn my recordings into coherent blog posts. Fingers crossed!

    • Venkat — that’s a good talent to have. I am sure someone can. Have you thought of interviews?

  93. Dear Neil,

    Problem I am facing with hiring writers is that good writers are very expensive while budget writer usually cheat. I hired few writers using Facebook groups etc but this time I am gonna try Elance.

  94. This is best study case for Technology Website ? or have another way . thanks for your answer. Neil.

  95. Great article, surely the hired writers won’t only write but also will promote for us.

    Thanks for sharing!

  96. Hi Neil,

    when is the appropriate time to hire a writer?

    I want to start a new blog and monetize it, but my ideas aren’t so good and the niches are too crowded.

    Should the blog be already SEO optimized before hiring? Should I have already written posts? Or just let the writer initiate the content?

    I’m reading through all the content on the blog and it is quite overwhelming.

    Thanks!

    • Adrian — I think your schedule will dictate when you need to hire a writer. If you find a great writer they will incorporate optimization within the posts.

  97. Hello Neil,
    Thanks for the lovely post. i am a part time blogger. and i read most of your post. i was out of blogging things from last month, and suddenly got your post when Darren shared this.
    thanks to both of you 🙂

  98. Shamit Khemka :

    I agree with the points 1:- Subject matter 2:- Length 3:- Tone 4:- Examples 5:- Purpose
    these are main point through audience can more and more arrive back on your site or blog to read more interesting and new post.
    When more audience are involving with post need to work on these points, 1:- Conversational tone 2:- Personality 3:- Fluff 4:- Facts 5:- Short paragraphs 6:- Formatting 7:- Pictures 8:- Subheadings 9:- Italicizing and bolding 10:- External links 11:- Media 12:- Conclusion 13:- Question

    • Shamit — thanks for the outline of the strategy. Looking forward to hearing much more from you.

  99. Thanks Neil! I posted my job ad last week on Problogger and got loads of excellent responses. I was a bit hesitant given the adult nature of what I was looking for. But I asked for Cosmo/Womens Health style writers and I’ve got a collection of bloggers who have published articles in those magazines online, and lots with industry experience.

    I have an awesome shortlist of 6, and might use them all!

    I’m blown away with the quality of bloggers from Problogger – totally worth the money!

  100. Hi, This is a really great article you produced here 🙂 but let me ask you one and in my opinion the most important question: How much will it cost?

    People who starts with their blogs can’t afford at the beginning a writer who will charge a lot of money for a great content … so maybe you have some alternative ways to produce great content?

    • Tom, you can always hire interns who are looking to get their foot into the door — that’s a solid strategy I have used in the past.

  101. Rahul Singhal :

    Hi Neil,
    First of all, I would like to congratulate you for your success for Kissmetrics blog.
    & To be truth, I have to say You are always an inspiration as well as source of all knowledge for us.

  102. Brian Collier :

    Neil,

    I am starting a new blog that I hope will explode relatively quickly using these techniques.

    My question is in starting a new blog, are you using your writers specifically as ghost writers to write content that you publish under your name, or are you creating a team of writers with their own by-lines.

    I feel that finding good writers that are willing to write under your name will help your authority in the niche grow, but do you find that most writers are willing to get paid to write under your name and not their own?

    Thanks for all you do!

    -Brian

    • Brian, it all depends — I have seen mixed results. Just go in and crunch the numbers while testing.

  103. Hi, It’s really nice post to hiring article writer I got many knowledge reading this post. Really so helpful. But I am starting new blog and newbie blogger, I have not enough money for spend for article writer. But I will try to my best quality article in my blog.
    Thank You so much Neil Sir.

  104. I like the last tip on the template email as to how to reach out to other influential bloggers in the same industry to share a blog’s post (assuming content is of high quality, of course).

    If a big blog shares a post on their social media, the chances of the post going viral on social media as well as getting many relevant links rapidly increases too.

  105. Great Post.

  106. Hi, Neil!

    Thanks for the great tips!

    Just wanted to share our experience, as it might come in handy for someone: we are using Blogmutt.com for writing content. Some of our posts proved to be very insightful for the users and got many hits and shares (even though our blog is only 6 months old). And it’s also cost-efficient, user-friendly and has an amazing customer support:)

  107. andrew the Home business blogger :

    Hello neil i came across your post by google and i sometimes receive your sub emails at adress passed in the email section which i read from time to time.

    I have started up a new blog recently and just wanted to say thank you for this post i am going to start this off tomorrow, I have been considering getting a far better writer or writers than myself so i can focus on design alot more and get the site growing alot more with content. but like new bloggers starting with a shoestring budget and have been alot busy with other projects offline i have found it very hard to keep writing

    But thank you for a brillant for a wonderful post have bookmarked it and will be reading your emails alot often

    • It’ll be something for you to look forward to. The sooner you can start bringing on people to help you research and write, the faster you’ll grow.

  108. Bayu [kronologibayu] :

    Post title this article tempting me.
    So, the conclusion at this article is Hire Writer to make post on our blog, right?.

  109. Tech Savvy Guy :

    Can’t Spend $100 – $200 on a post, Is there any other option?

  110. Neil I like your thinking. Your links idea is interesting…think I’ll try it out.

  111. These amusements required more spaces in the PCs,

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