Why No One Comments on Your Blog and What to Do about It

comments

One of the biggest worries bloggers have is the silent blog syndrome. After putting endless hours of hard work into your blog, you find that it remains silent. No one comments. No one argues. No one praises. It’s a dark and lonely place.

How do you get people to comment on your blog? What tricks, techniques, and powers of persuasion must you possess? A quiet blog can be depressing, while an active blog is exciting. Once people start chiming in, sharing tips, arguing points, and having a conversation, you feel as if your blogging existence has finally been validated.

In this article, I want to explain some of the reasons why people might not be commenting on your blog. And I’m going to tell you what you can do to fix it.

Why no one comments on your blog

Before I dive into the how-to of creating a comment-happy blog, I want to give you some advice on how you should approach the issue.

We often approach the question of gaining comments as if it’s something we can, by trick or by force, get people to do. Actually, it doesn’t work that way. Commenting on a blog is something that your readers do voluntarily.

They choose to do it because they want to. And what prompts their volition? Really outstanding content. It can be outstandingly good. It can be outstandingly bad. It can be outstandingly controversial. It just needs to be outstanding. Create outstanding content before thinking, “How can I get people to comment?”

In addition to that, commenting is really about marketing. If there is no one to read a blog, there will be no comments. If you want blog commenting, you also have to do blog marketing.

Now that we got that out of the way, let’s dive into your blog and figure out why you’re not getting comments.

Do you have a bad comment system?

Let’s start at the ground floor. Can people easily leave a comment? If not, that’s a problem.

I know there are blogs where I would be willing to leave a comment, but I just can’t do it because of a broken comment system. Maybe the Captcha code isn’t working. Or I’m forced to choose an avatar. Or I have to log in to some system. Or I have to wait for the moderator to approve my comment. Or I don’t even know where to click to leave a comment.

All of these factors are comment killers. Look at your blog commenting process with fresh eyes. Or have someone else look at it, navigate it, and try to leave a comment. Fix any barriers and move on.

A good way to ensure that you don’t have these problems is to stick with basic commenting systems. You don’t need to sign up for any crazy commenting systems. Using the default commenting system that comes with WordPress is good enough.

Do you have a poor site design?

If someone doesn’t like your site design, sorry, but they’re not going to leave a comment. I know, it sounds cold and heartless, but design really matters to a potential commenter.

My blog is designed to support interaction. Without even reading an entire article, a user can directly click through to the comments.

comment count

Beyond that, I make my comment call to action very simple and straightforward:

comment form

When you try to stuff a lot of different elements at the end of a blog, you miss the golden moment for capturing a would-be commenter.

Also, you should show the comments that other people left for the new visitors to see. If you are piping in without knowing what’s already in the queued comments, it’s like saying something in the middle of a conversation that you haven’t even been listening to.

Forbes, for example, does a poor job of encouraging comment interaction because of its busy design and a no-show comment stream:

comment forbes

And for this reason, Forbes doesn’t get a ton of comments per post.

Your site design needs to help encourage comments. A well-designed blog is the starting point for anything good in life, comments included.

Do you blog as a corporate entity?

One of the hardest things to do is to blog as the voice of a business. Does a business write? Does a business speak? Does a business blog?

It’s a pretty awkward way to write. And it’s painfully boring to read.

The best blogs are those that come from a person, an individual…someone with a voice, emotion, feeling, passion, and experiences.

You probably recognize blogs from people like Seth Godin, Perez Hilton, and Tim Ferris. Why? Because these blogs are hot! They’re comment-heavy. They’re popular. And, get this: they’re personal.

Even if the content isn’t written exclusively by the personality backing the blog, you know that the content is going to have a very personal flavor. You don’t have to be a celebrity to create content like this. You just need to be yourself.

People will comment and interact with other people, not with a faceless and soulless corporate mouthpiece. Be personal, and the comments will come.

Do you say anything original?

“Being original” is really hard. You might whine and think that originality is impossible. But when you read about Nikola Tesla, Thomas Edison, Elon Musk, or Jackson Pollock, you’d eat your words about originality.

You can be original. But, like I said, it’s really hard.

As hard as it may be, strive for originality on your blog. Or, if you can’t be 100% original, steal the best ideas from the brightest people, and put your spin on it. Say something unoriginal in an original way.

Do you have a boring writing style?

Great content gets shared and commented on. Boring content gets ignored.

If you’re struggling with a no-comment blog, you may want to explore ways of getting more interesting. Too many passive sentences? No strong verbs? Lack of anecdotes? Dry topics?

Figure it out, and rework your content to make it a bit more exciting. In other words, spice up your writing style. Be personal, clear, and concise.

Do you ignore interaction?

When you write a blog post, you’re starting a conversation. And, if you start a conversation, you should do the polite thing and continue that conversation.

If someone comments on your blog, do your best to respond to it. You don’t have to write a long personal letter to everyone, but at least acknowledge their presence. They’ve done you a favor, so return it.

When you, as the author of a blog, ignore interaction, it discourages any further interaction. I do my best to jot a quick reply to every commenter. I can’t provide answers to all the questions or address every issue. I do, however, want to respond with courtesy and respect to every person who has taken the time to read and respond to my content.

Do you ask for comments?

There’s no shame in asking for comments. Just ask for them.

If you remember only one point from this article, this is the one: To get comments, ask for them.

It’s not begging. It’s not groveling. It’s not whining. It’s a polite invitation to have a civil discussion about an important issue.

Here are some of the angles you can use to encourage participation:

  • Ask a leading question – I usually raise a question at the end of each article, just to get people thinking. Sometimes, these questions surface in the comments.
  • Raise an issue for discussion – rather than have a maybe-approach to comments, go ahead and start the discussion yourself. Tell people what to talk about.
  • Tell your readers their input is valuable – your readers want to know that they have a voice too. Although you’re providing information, you welcome their perspectives and insights. Tell them so. “I’d love to hear what you think about this issue. Let me know in the comments.”

When asking for comments, keep in mind that requests like “please comment!” are weak and uninspiring. Try to be a bit smoother and more engaging:

  • “I’m wondering what other people think about the new widget. Tell me about your experience in the comments below.”
  • “I’m probably leaving out some information. What other tips can you provide about this issue?”
  • “Share your story in the comments.”

Do you provide something of value in your writing?

When people read your content, they’re basically giving you their money. As you already know, time is money. If readers spend their time/money on your content, they expect to derive some value. Is your content valuable? Is it worth your readers’ time/money?

If it is, they might voice this in the comments. If you’re not providing something of value, people will feel slightly ripped off. They spent this time reading your article but got nothing good from it.

The more value you provide in your content, the better comment interaction you’re going to score. Think of your readers as customers dropping a few dollars in order to read your blog post. What are you going to give them in return?

Do you write anything really compelling?

You’ve probably been to an epic concert, performance, speech, or movie at the end of which you just wanted to stand up and let out a shout of appreciation.

You can create content that evokes similarly strong emotions and reactions. People want to be motivated, encouraged, or challenged. If you write in a way that moves people, they will likely be moved to leave a comment.

It goes back to the issue I keep harping on — it’s all about the content.

Do you ever get controversial?

Sometimes, you just need to say what you think and let the chips fall where they may. Strong people are not afraid to be opinionated, and they have the thick skin to take the kickback. If you have a personal blog, you have the right to voice your concerns, raise questions, or confront people.

The more open you are, the more likely people are to respond with comments.

A blog is like any form of human communication. It’s a two-way street. But in order for the listener to respond, he or she must feel like there’s something to respond to. If you dip your toe in the waters of controversy, you can be pretty sure someone is going to respond.

If you feel strongly about a relevant trend, current issue, or hot topic, go ahead and write freely. Even if it’s a tad on the controversial side.

Conclusion

There are so many advantages to an active blog. You generate excitement, get engagement, elicit feedback, establish authority, invite backlinks, and get extra SEO juice.

It’s a beautiful thing. All you have to do is get rid of the barriers to comments and produce the best content you possibly can.

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Comments

  1. Great summary, Neil. Glad you took the time to really outline all of the points in text – thanks!

  2. We’ve had a lot of success asking a question at the end of our blog posts, it’s increased comments from zero to 2 or 3 every time we post, which is a great improvement. The next step is to write better content like you say, should take us to the next level.

    • Yes, Kenny, asking questions helps a lot. But what questions to ask is also very important.

      If you don’t have a super outstanding content, and if you don’t have a loyal audience yet, then asking simple questions work best in my opinion.

      The more deep and sophisticated content and the more attentive audience you have, the more in-depth and arguable questions may trigger commenting boost.

    • Kenny, great points. Thanks for sharing :)

    • I agree Kenny. Asking a question can make a big difference. I find it easier if I imagine the reader first and then try to think of a question that could open up an ongoing dialogue.

  3. Great article, And also great design tips to increase comments, but personally I believe that people comment only when the content is really helpful, and the comment system is simple to use.

    • Ahmed Shawan :

      I’m almost agreed with you Rajiv, great content can only bring more engagements by readers and if people do not read your content then you will surely not get any response at all. People only comment when they read something on your blog other than they leave your site doing nothing

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  4. First off thanks a lot neil for such a wonderful blogpost.

    You always comes with a rocket launcher post with you.

  5. Hi Neil,

    Great post, but I think there’s a little bit more to it than that. I recently wrote a post for HotelContractBeds.co.uk called “The Beginning of the Free Wi-Fi Hotel Revolution?”.

    It got ZERO comments on the HCB blog.

    But when I published the same post on LinkedIn, it got over 33 individual comments (which for HCB is really good!).

    The moral of the story I think is your blog needs to be recognised and have some sort of following to begin with. I’m not sure we’ve managed to establish that yet with HCB…

    • Seems to be an apples-and-oranges comparison if you already didn’t have a following on HotelContractBeds.co.uk as opposed to your network on LinkedIn.

      Did you share your article with anyone before you posted it on LinkedIn?

      • Well we don’t have any followers on our LinkedIn business page, so yes, I did share it with specific target-audience groups. I figured by putting the content directly in front of the right people who work – and it did.

        The thing is, how do you put an entire blog in front of the right people? And get them to regularly follow it?

        • “And get them to regularly follow it?”

          Implement email subscriptions so that you can inform them of new posts (that’s how I came to this post, incidentally).

          If you’re having trouble getting subscriptions from occasional readers, optimize your site for that conversion. Implement a smart popup that collects info as a reader is about to exit your blog (again, QuickSprout is a great example — if you’re not technical, the SumoMe plugin for WordPress will do the trick). Produce a very in-depth, high-demand whitepaper or e-book and put it behind an information paywall that requires people to subscribe before downloading (again, take a cue from QuickSprout) :)

    • It’s simple… This group has great value and engagement.. Nothing more nothing less.

      It is similar like when I post new article to my google plus page – I do not get nothing, but when I post it to specific group – I getting almost (20-40 +1, share, comments) within 24 hours..

      The point is that you have to thinking about your ideal customers and learn where to find them…

      I would say that Quicksprout is greate place to start :)

    • Louise, great point! It’s all about sharing throughout your social channels :)

  6. Wao…. But I never get any real comments to my site unless i have a huge traffic for that page..

  7. Can it be hard to work out why your not getting comments.?
    Is it not a very small percentage will actually comment and if you not getting a lot of traffic to see many comments

    Love to know your thoughts

  8. Your comment form is my favorite type of comment box, which is why I’m leaving a comment :)

    There are so many times I know how to leave a comment but I don’t want to sign up or log in or use disqus or facebook. A simple comment process can go a long way!

  9. I have GOT to get more controversial on my blog! My opinions are always provocative, yet I’ve always had trouble letting that out through my business. It really is time to be as unique a voice in my business blogging as I am in person. Hmmm, feeling inspired to write now! Off I go to blog about how much I hate the phrase “serial entrepreneur”.

  10. Hi Neil,

    In addition to all that you said, unless you are a big shot, many people still won’t comment. I think commenting is about creating community.

    Apart from all these great points about writing and interaction, it is very important to build a close community of a handful of bloggers who would comment/reciprocate and encourage other people to comment on each other blog posts.

    That approach works wonderfully for small bloggers who do not have thousands of visitors every single day.

    Just my two cents :-)

    Thank you for a great topic and some great insights into blog commenting!

    Regards,
    Kumar

    • Personally, I’m not a big fan of reciprocation, although I have to admit that it is a good way to kick comments off on a blog.

      However, I think reciprocation encourages shallowness from the bloggers who take part.

      Cheers,
      Jonathan

      • Jonathan,

        Please look at so many comments that have come here, right against this very post.

        What do you think? Do you think people have out their hearts in writing those lines?

        I don’t think most people like to leave comments and those who do, either want traffic or want a backlink. Very few comment for building relationships and to contribute to the community.

        So, when you say reciprocation isn’t a good idea, you won’t be getting many comments unless you are Neil Patel or somebody of that kind of traffic.

        When you are building your audience and community, reciprocation is the way you start to build it, one person at a time.

        I think reciprocation is very important for smaller sites. Otherwise, many never may see light if the day and they don’t.

        Just my opinion based in experience. I reciprocate and the kind of comments I get, are not any shallower than what most people get. Plus, it got me an opportunity to build some great relationships.

        Again, this is just my experience. Things may be different for different bloggers and it also depends on our individual reciprocation policies.

        Regards,
        Kumar

      • cjnjvcfdddddddddvjjjjjn

    • Kumar, thanks for sharing. Looking forward to hearing more from you :)

      • Neil,

        In my response to Jonathan, I made some typos and I will be grateful if you could correct them for me, please :-)

        Sorry to put you through this trouble. I only realized that after I pressed that “SUBMIT” button and now can’t go back and change.

        Regards,
        Kumar

  11. “You probably recognize blogs from people like Seth Godin, Perez Hilton, and Tim Ferris. Why? Because these blogs are hot! They’re comment-heavy. They’re popular. And, get this: they’re personal.”

    Seth Godin doesn’t enable comments on his blog. :) http://sethgodin.typepad.com/

    Cheers,
    Jonathan

  12. Hello Neil, agree with Kenny, I’ve great experience with asking question at the end of blog posts like you..

    I learned (copy) this ‘tactic’ from you few weeks ago and results are awesome.. or much much better..

    And this weekend I saw how one guy ran a contest for commenting on his blog.

    He wrote ‘review post’ and put this commenting contest to this review.. He offered around $50-70 for the random winner…

    Result was around 170 comments on this review post within two days.. I was really impressed by this method.

    • Jan, yes like Neil said asking a question at the end makes your commenters interactive and they tend to respond if they have something to share!

      And yes, running a contest is a great way to get more comments, no doubt half of the comments would be “great post”, or “thanks for the post” but that surely will increase the number of comments!

      • You’ve almost right… But this guy solved this problem.

        As I said, he used this method in review post(plugin review).. and simply put rules for this contest..

        – Go to sales page and learn about product
        – Post specific opinion about plugin
        – Comments must be ‘plugin’ related with real name

        done.. 170 comments without spammy comments like “great post” or “thanks for the post”

        So in my eyes, this action plan is brilliant.. I will use this scheme as soon as possible..

    • Jan, awesome! Sounds like he has the process down pat!

  13. A great article Neil!

    I think I need to be more controversial with my blog as I think I play it too safe sometimes.

    I will also start to ask questions at the end of my article to try and get more comments.

    Thanks

  14. Great suggestions Neil, thank you.

    One issue that I see on some blog is that they are not responsive AND make impossible to deal with the comment section from Iphone.

    – Rob

  15. the evidence here speaks for itself : )

  16. Thanks for your ideas – always great.
    I liked the comment about asking a question at the end of a post.

  17. Great post as always, Neil!
    I would like to add that it may also be a matter of scale.
    For example, if a blog has a thousand readers and gets 1 to 3 unsubscribes and 0 to 2 comments on average, it an be very discouraging but not too bad when you take scale into account.

    Blogs with huge readerships like 50 to 200k people might get a higher unsubscribe rate and 20 to 100 comments on average and a bigger core audience. I read recently they even popular blogs get unsubscribes and not as many comments sometimes when they post. It is just that big blogs have a higher subscribe and interaction rate to begin with and that makes it worth the while.

    I could be wrong about this but as the number of subscribers increase with the magic number being around 1k, interaction also goes past the “tipping point” where there is a lot more social proof, sharing and so on.
    My two cents worth.
    Thanks a lot for your awesome posts!
    Harish

  18. Amazing Neil, would really love to hear what you say about promoting the blog, especially for someone who is just starting and is not a big name in the industry.

  19. Hello Sir, Thanks for the great stuff. All points are important to get huge comments on blog, but when I run a new blog, then I got a few comments because I think people don’t want to comment on a new blog page rank which is low and traffic is also low. So how to increase blog comments on the new blog?

    • Fakhruddin, yes thats true because its a new blog people dont interact much through comments. The most important thing that you need to focus on is getting more traffic to your blog, because if you dont have reader there are no commenters . Once you have a dedicated audience who reads your blog, you can follow the points that Neil shared about getting more comments.

    • Fakharhuddin, just keep providing great content and the comments will come.

  20. Great stuff Neil, I’ve been looking for an article like this for a while now. Glad it’s come from you haha!

  21. Thanks for the article. You make a few suggestions that I am going to implement on my website/blog to increase comments.

  22. Nice article! My company (and tutors) tick all your points so that’s positive, but what does success look like?

    I.e. is there a “success ratio” that helps us establish if you’re doing the right thing e.g. No. Readers vs No. Commenters….

    What is good and what’s great?

    0.01%
    0.1%
    1%? More?

    Cheers!
    Maurice

  23. This comment, is an indication of my approval and appreciation of all your blogs!

  24. Hi @Neil you are right if you want to get more comments then you need to have good design, writing styles, topic etc.

    But I think first you have to get traffic and for getting traffic you need to have good SEO blog or website as well as you need to promote your blog, see any blog is having great content but not properly optimized for SEO then what’s the use of that.

    By the way very good article.

  25. I presently write for corporate blogs and all those comments i receive is BS spam mostly from bots and some bad SEOs trying to get back links. Anything more can not be done with that and i will be keeping these tips from you to follow in my personal blog which will be launched soon.

    And Neil you got a wonderful and attractive comment system and you responds well. But how you manage to get rid of spam? You have no moderation, no captcha then how came your blog with out any spam comments?

    And what you say about things like comment luv which allows people to have their latest post shown along with their comment? Don’t that encourage people to comment because that brings them some visitors too?

    • Yes, comment luv does help. But what I do is just moderate comments a few times a day to clear up bots and spam. Akismet also helps with this.

  26. Great post as always Neil. Asking questions in the end is a great approach. I also like a simplistic comment box like you have here.

  27. Great post Neil and great advice.

    What if and it’s a big what if………

    I am pretty sure I have a solid niche audience (baby Boomers), original content that offers value, an easy to use comment section, a call to action at the end of every blog, equal parts controversy, need resolution and humor in my writing, good traffic (1000+ visits/day) and I interact with others in my social media and yet I still get no comments?

    Any ideas Neil?

    • Consider testing Facebook comment system as it may help… if you are getting a ton of traction on the social web, maybe with the use of their commenting system you will see more engagement.

  28. Great insight, we need outstanding content!!

  29. Hi Neil,

    This post is described in an informative way by you. We all face this kind of problem. Specially in the beginning of our blogging career. Whenever we visit to any website then if the website has bad comment system which frustrate the audience doesn’t able to drive comments at that website.

    At many blogs blogger try to manipulate the visitors by fake comments. They don’t able to build trust.

    Thanks for the post.

    ~Ravi

  30. Hello Neil! Great post as always. I am curious what your thoughts are on Disqus? I might remove it this next week on one of my sites after reading this article and see what happens. I would think Disqus for most people would make it easier since they are most likely already logged into one of the social networks and technically there are less fields to fill out. But I guess I will have to do more testing. Thanks!

  31. Neil —

    This post is SEO’d so much that it’s affecting readability and distracting from the over all message.

    First time for everything … I still love your posts and look forward to them every day. :)

  32. Neil Sir… I am using Disqus….is it a bad commenting system..

    • We have also recently implemented Disqus, I’m curious about your take on it Neil.

      I personally think it’s pretty great, although you do have to “sign up” to get total use of it, which may be a slight deterrent. The sign up is only once, and then all of this info – Name, Email, Website is all populated for the user, that alone I think makes commenting easier for users.

      Though I could see it being a bit of an annoyance to “sign up” in the first place, but the after effects are well worth it. Plus there is always an option to use the Disqus commenting platform as a guest and then it is treated just like the default WP commenting system.

      • I also thonk about switching to Disqus. But I did not… Simply because the points you mentioned above.

        1 – When people ‘have to’ sign up in the first place = you will lost lot of potential commentators…(my opinion)

        2 – Lot of marketers use blog comments as a link back to their latest article(not homepage).. So I would say that these people never give you comment ..(again, only my opinion)

    • I have been using Disqus as well and after reading the points Neil shared I am doubting I should keep that. I would also love to hear what Neil’s views are on Disqus commenting system.

    • Manohar, it’s a great tool and allows you to integrate with FB.

      • Currently I am Using blogger. I have a future plan of switching to wordpress. After switching i Will use…A commenting system like Ur’s Neil….It,s really good…..

  33. Sometimes, I get a lot of personal messages from readers (email or through site’s contact form)… at the end of the day, most said my articles are useful for them… but most don’t do blog commenting. It seems quiet on the surface, but underneath there are lots of interaction and activities.

  34. Just updated couple of articles and asked users to provide their view in comments ;). Thanks Neil.

  35. Neil,

    As always informative and engaging. I have one of those silent blogs, actually two of those silent blogs. I will certainly review your points about my blogs that may be stumbling blocks to participation.

    Joe

  36. Also be active in your own comments.

  37. Great article!!

  38. Hey Neil,

    You are right, we have to look at these maters to encourage more comment. These tips are really helpful.
    Thank you for sharing… :)

  39. Neil, like Jan said I think running contest on blog can help you gain more comments! What are your views on that?

  40. I’ve been getting a good amount of comments on my blog when you compare it to my blogs traffic. I’m currently working on making more posts and working to drive traffic to an all time high.

    If the comments keep up with the rate that i’m looking to accelerate, I won’t be able to answer them all. I guess that’s a good problem to have :)

  41. Awesome post on blogs. I will follow your points for blog. Thanks!!!!

  42. Totally agree with your point about it being hard to comment on some (many) blogs. If there’s a requirement for me to sign up for a service and then create a user name and password just to leave a comment, I almost always move on. Not worth the time and hassle.

  43. Thank you for doing this article. I was able to use some of the tips towards my desolate youtube channel. I rate and comment on a lot of people’s videos and it works but still seeking a better way to get traffic to my youtube channel that won’t cost an arm and a leg, free preferably. Been doing it part time since 2012 and by now I would think things would pick up a bit more. Thanks again! Gina

  44. Thanks for this insight. With regards to using a “fancy” comment system, clearly you prefer to keep it simple, but if one were to upgrade the comment system what criteria would you look at? In other words what exactly is the additional value you think a fancier third party comment system would introduce?

  45. Hey Neil,

    I love blog commenting because it’s where you get to connect with your readers. I know for me I had to put myself out there enough so that people got curious and luckily they enjoyed what I shared as well. The conversations have continued to this day and we’re going into three years now.

    I do ask questions at the end of my posts and I do ask for comments. The reason mostly is because when I started this I didn’t know people wanted me to comment so I didn’t. Had I known I would have so see, not everyone knows.

    Great share as always and happy commenting everyone.

    ~Adrienne

  46. Great post Neil! We all do love comments in our blogs :)

    Yes people love to engage with other influencers/famous bloggers but I think for them the most challenging thing is to deal with spam comments on a daily basis. I think you have to deal with this too. The more popular a blog gets it increases the number of spams.

    I have written a post on this called “The Not So Bright Side of Being A Famous Blogger” which you might agree on. Here’s where you can find it: http://www.famousbloggers.net/bright-side.html

    In this case spam filtering plug-ins like Akimist saves a lot of time. But still I think comment approval is needed for every blog unless one might want to see some keyword stuffed or unrelated comments.

    But Neil, How do you deal with spam comments?

  47. hi neil,

    Nice article neil but i feel that you should write something about comment exchange software also like commentluv.

  48. Great one big bro. Strong verbs and anecdote – think those are my no-comment antidotes!
    And how I wish getting traffic is like getting stuck, as usual, in my great country, Nigeria. Need to roll up my sleeve and get working.
    “Pls comment?” No more!

    What do you think? I am setting up a new website, but don’t know if WordPress can handle it. It is such that will have like ten or more administartors and would really be interactive. I actually use drupal but you are making a part of me to want to use WordPress.

    One more: concerning the commenting system, one really need to understand one’s audience before making the choice of setting up one. Choosing the facebook comment system might not be okay for a site, while its okay for another. This is because some people wouldn’t want their friends to know they visited such site and really read stuff on it.
    What do you see to this?

    I just wish I could pull your cheek someday, and really bring out a nice smile.
    Stay Neilous.

  49. Please please help us get some traffic, comment on our blogs etc. Our content is genuine, think I need to ask questions at the end like you mentioned. You are the man Neil :)

  50. Thank you. Lately comments that appear in my blog less than usual. I suspect this is because of the articles that I present is less attractive to other bloggers, but I feel these articles should I add to make my discussion on the topic before being whole.

  51. I agree with Neil in principle…I’ll just add my own thoughts and concerns here. To get people commenting on your posts, you must have page views – that is people visiting the site. Absent that, you won’t have comments.

    I personally don’t think it makes a difference if you use the built-in WordPress comment system, Facebook Commenting, Discus, or LiveFrye. They all require you to have an account and login with it, unless you permit anonymous comments, which opens you wide for spam.I do recommend against IntenseDebate, because it is a platform that never really took off.

    Neil…if you have strong thoughts about Discus vs. WordPress Native for a political / news blog operation, please share.

    I find with my own site, 95% of the commenting happens on Facebook and Twitter, because I share my posts in numerous venues on these social media. So, people tend to comment on the social media platform rather than coming to the site.

    I do have comment approval turned on, because the subject matter tends to attract a lot of haters, and then I would have to spend my time deleting nasty comments along with the spam.

  52. Thanks for writing such a great post having comments in a blog is very essential and one can estimate how popular is the blog if it has lots of comments

  53. I’m currently using Comment Luv, and it’s great. It’s kind of like promoting your blog for free and it encourage comments from readers. :)

  54. Yes, I agree with your thought. I often to read the information in many blog and I realize that a bad comment system is very important for the visitors. They do not like and they never feedback in your blog. Thank you for your advice. Nice day!

  55. Totally agreed, Epic content is just what forces a reader to comment, share and appreciate your work. Thanks for all the points you highlighted in this post. Keep up the good work, Neil!

  56. Neil, http://www.techblogcorner.com is my personal blog, would you please see and suggest me what changes i have to made in my blog.

  57. Mumtaz Khan :

    Excellent points. Thanks for sharing. I read all your articles and learning a lot out of those.

  58. I will add something that might be interesting. It seems that “WordPress” bloggers doesn’t like to comment on any other commenting system. If it is custom build commenting system or the website isn’t based on WordPress, blogosphere rarely leave a comment.

  59. Awesome post Neil, And also great design tips to increase comments, but personally I believe that people comment only when the content is really helpful, and the comment system is simple to use. Thanks Neil for sharing this wonderful content.

  60. Hi Neil,

    Good article as usual. I found that people comment on the blog to get link back to them which can bring traffic. In modern comment system like Social comments integration or other they can’t get backlinks and which leads to decrease in comments. Correct me if I am wrong.

  61. Aparna Sisodia :

    Great tips as always, thanks!

  62. So simple, yet so many people fail to follow it.

    Let’s hope my blog will not follow that course ;)

    IMO it’s all about the tribe/community. I don’t care how many people read your shit, but if they don’t really do anything about it, or give a damn, it doesn’t matter, does it?

  63. Great article, Neil. In one of my websites, I had installed Disqus. I realised that Disqus does not let you leave a comment if you don’t have an account with them. I removed Disqus. I feel this is the problem with fancy commenting systems like Disqus and Facebook.

  64. We think alike, Neil. :)

    Having started as a personal blogger (and still *am*), I found that the only way to keep a following is to respond to comments and to return them on the commenter’s blog.

    I get comments if I give comments. I always loved that kind of exchange.

    One of my personal blogger friends is an example of success: http://hey.georgie.nu/bermuda-wasnt-built-in-a-day/ This post counts 21 comments including replies, but there are more posts in her archives that goes way beyond that.

    This week I’m working on a blog post for a client that aims to help bloggers start a niche blog on the basis of their personal blogging experience. You know what? I’m going to link to this post. ;)

    – Luana S.

  65. Hey Neil

    I think its important to follow a clean post structure with real effort put into the work.

    Popular bloggers also spend a hell of a lot of time editing their work to make it as powerful as possible, all this adds to people wanting to comment.

    I think this is a very useful post for a lot of people :) I really like how you ask a direct question at the end of your posts – it encourages interaction.

    Paul

    • Hey Paul! Look at the results your comment brought to you: I’m one of the commenters here, I placed my comment and read the others, found yours, followed the link to your site and I liked it, so I signed up for your newsletter and followed you on Twitter.

      The magic of comments. ;)

      • Hey Luana

        The comments area is a great place to meet people and discover a lot of new things. I regularly contribute to my favourite blogs, so you will see me on here quite often :)

        Thank you for signing up! I look forward to hearing from you.

        Paul

    • Paul, thanks for your insights. I always look forward to hearing from you. Direct questions really get the conversation going :)

  66. Thanks a lot Neil for such a wonderful blog post.
    I always look out for your post in my inbox. Will surely apply your suggestions on my travel blog. Thanks again.

  67. Hello This is a great article! I’m going to pin it and tweet it! Thanks!

  68. Hey Niel,
    Every time i visit your site your content itself force me to make a mark of thanks.

    I try to follow this your techniques that you try to express but rather it makes a difference. I think i need to differentiate what lacks in me.

    Thanks :)

  69. Would you recommend staying away from things like Discus or Facebook commenting?

    As a website owner they seem great to me, as someone who is commenting I always get put off of commenting when I see them.

  70. Well, I’d say it starts with very poor quality content, If they are not good they won’t get you the comments…

    Totally also agree with you on not giving room for interaction, If there is no room for it it won’t happen , you have initiate it by a question of some mind bugging statement…

    Low quality website/Bad design, if it is not pleasurable to the eyes you won’t have them on there talk more of commenting..

    Asking for it also says alot, If you ask who knows you might get it… Great points.. Thanks for sharing on kingged.com

  71. Thank you for this article, Neil. I must ask you though.. why is it a comment killer when a reader must wait for a moderator to approve the comment? I see lots of blogs that function like that, including my own. Won’t there be a lot of spam when you just let comments get onto your blog without you needing to approve them?

  72. Very helpfull and interesting points you had outlined @Neil Patel .Thanks for sharing your valueble tips.

    Regards,
    Abdul Ghani,
    http://www.techglows.com

  73. Asking a bunch of questions and commenting on other blogs works well Neil. Thanks!

  74. Hi Neil,

    My blog too was once silent and isolated and I used to be apprehensive thinking if ever I’d get comments. But as it turned out, that was a passing phase and I seem to have adopted the right strategies. Apart from the couple of initial anxious months years back, I’ve never felt the lack of comments on my blog.

    I used one strategy very strongly – blog commenting. Period. What you need to do is be helping. Whether you’re writing a blogpost or commenting on other blogs; be helpful, provide value, be personal, and original.

    You can also join a group of bloggers who’re known to comment on each others blogs, you can install CommentLuv commenting system to reward the commenters with a backlink to their latest posts, you can hold commenting contests, you can institute contributor appreciation awards like commenter of the month, you can write posts mentioning the names of bloggers known for commenting and linking out to them in order to have them comment on your blog, and of course, write the type of content that you’ve talked about.

    However, with the closure of comments by Copyblogger there was a bit of panic and speculation if comments are going to go away, but they won’t and they can’t. Communication and conversation are the backbone of building relationships. Of course, social media is there, but your blog is like your home, and there’s nothing like home! :)

    This was a great post on one of my favorite topics. Thanks for your time, effort and lessons on commenting.

    ~ Harleena

  75. Great post Neil. You can write the best content in the world, but if your site has limited visitors (or happens to be newer) you’ll struggle to get readers (and also comments). It’s really no secret, write good content, network with other bloggers, and the readership will come (along with the comments).

  76. Hey Neil. Needless to say it’s a nice post. I really agree with your thought of sticking to the in built commenting system of your CMS. While other are pretty and fancy, this gets the job done, quite well.
    Thanks for the awesome post!!!

  77. Just a few thoughts….

    1. Would it annoy people to have to scroll to the bottom to leave a comment ?

    2. Does the CTA (Speak Your Mind) make any difference?

    3. When I’m at this comment box, I assumed clicking TAB and press ENTER would post the comment. My assumption was completely wrong. Doing that will bring me to http://www.quicksprout.com/pro/ – and what’s worse, I lost my comment (tried to click the BACK button, useless!)

    • Sharing thoughts in comment box depends on content and design usefulness and interest to the visitor. Secondly visitors closely monitor responses against their comments . If they get interactive response they append to leave regular comments on blog. So it about practicing more to get comment luv. :)

    • I’ve found that scrolling doesn’t really affect the number of comments. At least when I tested it on Quick Sprout, it didn’t.

      The speak your mind boosted conversions for comments by 9%.

      Good to know on that short cut. Will look into that.

  78. I believe that the good user experience on any blog is must. Letting readers to share their points on a post is not only increase the number of comments count but also boot the trust factor of the author.
    Appealing readers to share their opinions at the climax of the post is a really most recommended point.
    Discussions also boot the number of returning visitors.

  79. Really very helpful information for newbie’s like me. thanks neil sir.

  80. ANIL SHRIVASTAVA :

    My Dear Neil, so great of you!
    Through this article you have opened a bright,new, whole world of blogging and their comments.I,too,will start writing blogs so that my readers are rejoiced, their thought are provoked and insight is built.

  81. Really needed to read this Neil. Thanks for covering the topic with so much depth! One of my short-term goals in the next 3 months or so is to improve my existing content and to come up with high quality posts that are worthy reads and points of discussion.

    With that, sharing with everyone Buffer’s post on creating quality, evergreen content: http://blog.bufferapp.com/the-complete-list-of-evergreen-content-ideas-for-your-blog :)

  82. Hi Neil,

    I also hate having to sign up for a comment system like Disqus.

    I don’t understand why anyone would want to make it so difficult – it’s a comment.

    Plus if you sign in with Email or FB you have to check all these boxes to agree to them posting on your page, viewing your friends… blah, blah, blah..

    I only wana comment!

    Naomi

  83. Well, frankly, I’ve noticed for most blogs the comment ratio is pretty minimal. A site can be very popular and have zero comments, regardless of the quality of posts. Interesting post, though. Comments systems can be important – sometimes people don’t want to give their full name, for instance. And there are varying formats. Some post an image of the commenter, and some people may be put off by this. Then there’s the likes of WordPress and Disqus, which actively encourage social interaction. Heck, maybe sometimes people just don’t want to comment. Reading the post is enough as it is.

  84. I love the fact that you always go in great detail, the one I loved the most was a premier company such as forbes aren’t doing things that can generate more link juice and commenters ((mainly)).

    Thanks for another awesome post

  85. Selection of the wrong commenting system is one of the major reason why there is a lack of comments in ones blog. I’ve personally experienced this factor. Over all this time, I’ve been trying out different comment systems in my WordPress blog.

    The one’s that required visitors to log in to comment ensured that the comments left were always few! :) Also, using captchas in comment form also turned the visitors off in my case.

    Another thing is lack of appealing and useful content. I personally has faced this situation, when I’ve been to a blog and didn’t find the content good enough to leave some good remarks or suggestions.

    Writing up some controversial articles, which will kick up a debate and asking users to comment using call to actions is also a great idea!

    I found the link to this article on Kingged.

    Arun

  86. Trying to get the conversation started on my site seems to be a challenge.

    Great post, going to go trouble shoot to see what I may be doing wrong that leads to silent posts.

    Thank you Neil

  87. Awesome post, Neil! Thank you. It’s really worth to ask for comments in the end of the article.

  88. Hey, I really appreciate the detail you bring out in each of your posts. The best one which I really liked was the infographic on bloggers.

    Thanks for another awesome post. It is definitely worth to ask for user feedbacks at the end of the article.

  89. I agree with you Neil. We should allow readers to add comments easily. I’ve seen that using CommentLuv plugin in WordPress attracts people to comment on your blog.

    Asking questions at the end also helps, thanks for sharing the tips.

  90. This was a great article, full of good suggestions, tips and things to reflect on. It inspired me to write the article that I’ve had in mind for weeks…Thank you!

  91. Neil,

    Great post bro! I missed you at T&C and meant to say “hello”, but I was tied up in several meetings while there and it didn’t happen.

    I appreciate your writing style a lot. It conveys that you have an opinion outside of selling services or products. That is rare these days and many folks look at their BLOG like a cash register and not a door to their house to get to know them. It’s the quick sell they want not taking time to build relationship.

    Your article was spot-on (like always) and your authority in the IM space, especially with blogs, shows it.

    Keep on being phenomenal bro!

    Remember… be a servant,

    Cory

  92. Hey Nail,
    You are absolutely right. BTW I think what you have mentioned that “bad commenting system” is one of the main fact of getting very poor comments.

  93. Neat (long as you always stress) article Neil. For me, most of my blogs have been getting huge number of comments until I removed commentluv plugin. Now, nobody is commenting. Was forced to remove the commentluv plugin due to spam.

    Will use your tips to do a thorough analysis and check where I am lacking on each of my blogs.

  94. Hey great article Neil! This is so important. I trouble shooted for sometime to find a happy solution. I have a question for you.

    Are you saying that it’s better to not have the user login to leave a comment, or to make the login as seamless and as simple as possible?

    Thanks!

  95. Great post. To encourage people to comment on articles in my web mag – fireartsmagazine.com – I sometimes transfer a really insightful comment into the facebook discussion group to give it more exposure. Almost all our readers are there and they love seeing their comment in the spotlight. If it was a comment of questionable nature, I would ask the writer, but does anyone know if I HAVE to do that every time?

    • Mariyak, I think your strategy is pretty solid. Let me know know if you need any help along the way. As for your question, I am not sure maybe someone else can help us out there :)

  96. Which comment system is best according to you? Default WordPress, Disqusor or Facebook or in general social media comment system?

    Thanks for the great article though.

  97. Hi… thanks for good information and i am receiving lots of spam comments in WP -Site…

  98. Wonderful tips like always. I’d love to see more from you as it helps me improve on things.

  99. Hi Neil !
    Sometimes these commenters use the comment system as a way to market their products. and it so displeasing, that calls for the action of not allowing guest commenters,

    One needs to sign in with Facebook to be able to comment or comment has to wait for moderation before it is published… This is to make sure that one does’t have spam comments….

    The key is having engaging content on information………….

  100. Very nice article. I’ll try to incorporate some of your tips to encourage visitors to comment on my site.

  101. The most important factor in inviting comments is to add a “voice” or personality to one’s posts. As you mentioned, writing as a corporate identity or a faceless identity won’t engage the readers as well as opinionated posts from strong writers.

  102. Would you mind looking at my blog and noting any suggestions that you might have? I’d really appreciate it.

  103. You once again rocked Neil. I’m back to quicksprout after long time and reading all new stuff you posted and learning hell lot of things.

    Thank you

  104. Another tip that I would like to share is: always keep the comment box ABOVE the comments so that people don’t have to scroll through all the comments to leave a comment themselves. Unfortunately, I don’t find that method being followed here, so I’m sure many people would have found it irritating and so would not have commented at all… Anyway, awesome post! Thanks for sharing!

  105. hi,Very nice article.

  106. Therre is definately a greeat deal to find out about this subject.
    I really like all of thhe points you made.

  107. Drop the Facebook Requirement :

    For me the biggest killer is Facebook comments. I wouldn’t want to subject myself to an unhealthy habit like using Facebook just in order to comment on your blog. (Notice how 99% of websites that require a Facebook account to comment have less than 10 comments per article.)

  108. th3technical like this so make comment thank you for sharing this awesome article ..www.th3technical.com

  109. That’s kind of information is providing a lot of ideas for the post,blog,articles that how can i improve our view and ideas.
    Thanks for posting these types of info………

  110. Great article. I always get so frustrated when I have to sign in to something just to leave a comment.

    I used squarespace to build my website and I love how simple the comment system is. You write your comment first, then it gives you a bunch of options as to how you want your name displayed.

    This blog’s comment system is awesome too. Good work!

  111. So it turns out I had technical issues that made commenting impossible! I am so glad I found your article or this never would’ve occurred to me!

    Thank you!

  112. That’s kind of information is providing a lot of ideas for the post,blog,articles that how can i improve our view and ideas.
    Thanks for posting these types of info………
    Wish u All The Best

  113. A gripping post Neil bro! What I liked is that this post emphasizes what people already know but forget to implement, and that’s the stuff that makes the most difference! :)

  114. it’s_interesting

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    I am sure, you’ve a huge readers’ base already!

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  121. Hello Neil,

    You have given good reasons. Bloggers now a days represent themselves as they are business. Instead of writing contact me they write contact us. Representing as a business discourages people to comment because they think no body will care about their comment.

    Thanks

  122. Great counsel here Neil. Truth is, I’ve been really bothered by the lack of a lot comments on my blog since I opened it. There’s this one time I even put out a question and not 1 person responded. I’d like more advice on this issue cos I believe I practice most of the points you gave here in this post. If you can, please look at my website and help me see what I’m doing wrong. I’d appreciate this very much, Neil. My website is http://www.davidadeleke.com. That being said, I must let you know how wonderful you and your blog have been to helping me grow as a blogger and online content creator. Thanks for all this.

  123. Hey Neil, great post! Getting people to comment on one of my newer websites, Immortal News, has been a bit troublesome. At first, it wasn’t getting any comments, then, as the traffic began to flow, comments began coming in. Unfortunately, the bulk of the comments left on the website were spam and this created an issue for our staff which then had to manually weed through them in order to find the legitimate ones. While we were using captchas in addition to the implementation of other somewhat common anti-spam techniques, we were unable to thwart the ever-resourceful spammers. Subsequently, we opted to integrate the Facebook comments function which allows our visitors to comment once logged into their Facebook accounts. While this was an effective approach to eliminating the bulk of the comment spam hitting our site, it also seemed to reduce the number of real comments left by visitors, as not everyone has a Facebook account and even amongst those who do, not everyone is willing to take the time to log into their accounts in order to leave a comment. In a perfect age, there would be no spam and no need for manual moderation of comments but alas, the world is not perfect and the endless cat and mouse game of comment spam ensues. Regardless of this, thanks for this insightful post. Engagement is critical and that’s something the writers at Immortal News will have to improve upon as they continue to hone their skills in online journalism. So again, thanks!

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  126. Hi,
    I seem to have decent page views for a new site under my ‘Ramblings’ page – but no one comments or likes.
    Could anyone possibly have a quick look and tell me what’s wrong?
    Do I swear too much or too little? – is the content not controversial enough. Is my writing not good enough or entertaining enough?

    Any feedback would be appreciated.

    Jack

    • 3 possible reasons if I may?

      #1. It’s not clear what your blog is about or why visitors should stick around to read it.

      To help you clarify this and give visitors a clear message about why they should read, ask yourself where your traffic is coming from.

      #2. You don’t include a comment box at the end of any of your posts so readers probably think you’re not interested in comments.

      #3. You don’t include an About Page giving visitors any idea of who you are, why you’re blogging (& your site’s called Jacks Looking At and yet you seem to be writing as if you’re a woman, which is confusing to readers.).

      Does this help you out regarding what might be going wrong?

  127. hey can you tell how i improve my blogs . i post blog and do SMO for it . but i have not see any improvement . so what should i do .

  128. Your blog has always been a good source for me to get quality tips on blogging. Thanks once again.

  129. Thanks share your valuable knowledge about blog commenting. Your all tips are really helpful for bloggers. I follow your all tips.

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  131. This was good article to read. Another reason is due to people not feeling comfortable posting. I love to post. I have a dashcam and capture all sorts of encounters: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I5h7qhaGoIg

  132. hey this is true no one comment my blog , i do what you say.

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