How to Make Your Site Insanely Fast

second clock

No matter how beautiful your site is, your website page speed is critical to success. Not only do faster load times help boost search engine rankings, but 40% of people will abandon a site if it takes longer than three seconds to load. To make matters worse, every extra second your site takes to load will cause a 7% decrease in your conversion rate.

So, how do you minimize your load times to maximize your revenue?

Well, I’ve used the techniques below to optimize Quick Sprout, and I’ve improved my load time by five seconds. Results, of course, vary, but if you follow the techniques below, you can expect anywhere from four to six seconds in time savings.

The basics

For starters, the key to faster pages is reducing the front-end load time. For the end-user, 80% of the response time is tied up in HTTP requests. This is the performance golden rule. That means you have to minimize those requests.

Here’s how to do that:

  • Simplicity – Make the page design simple. One or two images and text. But you probably want richer components on your site.
  • Combination – Taking all the scripts and piling them into a single script and, similarly, combining all CSS into a single stylesheet.

The rest of the performance techniques I’ll share with you will also render HTTP requests lower.

Combine images with CSS sprites

css sprites

If you have many images on your page, you are forcing multiple roundtrips of the server to get all the resources secured. This slows down page speed.

Sprites combine all background images on a page into one single image. The proper image segment will be displayed because of the CSS background-image and background-position properties.

CSS sprites reduce:

  • Delays caused by roundtrips made as the server is downloading other resources.
  • Request overhead.
  • Total number of bytes a page downloads.

You can use a service like SpriteMe to make this process easy. Otherwise, you can follow the sprite recommendations made by Google.

Enable compression

enable compression

You can compress resources by using deflate or gzip to actually lower the number of bytes a page is sending over a network. Using the GZIP compression algorithm, popular web servers like Apache and IIS do this automatically on HTML, CSS and javascript.

You still need to optimize your content for compression. There are two things you need to do to make sure your web content compresses effectively:

  • Create consistency across your HTML and CSS code. This happens when you:
    • Order the CSS key-value pairs in a common sense way, e.g., alphabetically.
    • Do the same with your HTML attributes.
    • Be consistent with your casing and use lowercase as often as possible.
    • Make sure you are consistent with your HTML tag attribute quotes.
  • Minify JavaScript and CSS. By getting rid of unnecessary line breaks, extra space, etc, you will speed up parsing, downloading and executing.

I recommend using one of these tools to minify JavaScript: JSMin, Closure Compiler or Yahoo’s Compressor.

Spread your static content with CDNs

Because the location of the user impacts page load speed, spreading your content across servers will speed up this process. You can use a content delivery network (CDN) to make this happen.

What exactly is a CDN? It’s just a collection of servers that exist at different places in the world. CDNs do two things:

  • Send files faster – Cached files are sent from locations that are closer to the specified user.
  • Shrink file size – CDNs deliver content that is without cookies. No bloated files.

For example, a CDN service provider could have servers in California, New York, Sweden and Hong Kong. When a user accesses your site, the server with the fastest network hops or quickest response time delivers the content. Someone in the Philippines might get served from Hong Kong. Someone in Mexico might get served content from California.

Using a CDN is a pretty simple code change, but it can be expensive. And while some large Internet providers have their own CDN, it’s best to use a service provider devoted to CDNs.

Leverage browsing caching by using “expires” headers

leverage browser caching

Any time someone visits your website, his or her browser will store a ton of files like stylesheets, scripts and images onto that persons’ hard drive. That will reduce the number of HTTP requests and speed things up next time that person visits your site.

Those files have an expiration date in the header. This is known as “expires” headers. By default, that expiration date could be set to 24 hours, meaning it will update every day. Very few, if any, websites need that short of an expiration date.

There are two things about this rule you have to keep in mind:

  • Static components – Set a “Never expire” policy far into the future. These components become cachable, avoiding time-consuming and unnecessary HTTP requests. “Expires” headers should be used for images, Flash, scripts and stylesheets.
  • Dynamic component – Use a cache-control header to help the browser with conditional requests.

The “expires” headers will tell a server for how long to cache an item. Most static files should be set to one year into the future.

Expires: Thu, 20 September 2013 20:00:00 GMT

Apache servers should use the ExpiresDefault command to set the date in the future compared to absolute time. Using the example above, the command would look like this:

ExpiresDefault “access plus 1 year”

You will have to change the component’s filename when you change that component in the future. From Google, you can see what cache response headers HTTP/1.1 provides.

Enable HTTP keep-alive response headers

HTTP requests are simple: they grab and send a single file and then close. That may be simple, but it isn’t very fast.

Keep-alive is a trick that basically says the web browser and server agree to use the same connection to grab and send multiple files. In other words, the server holds the connection open while you are on the site instead of opening a new connection with every request. This way your processor, network and memory don’t have to work too hard.

Here are two common ways of enabling keep-alive:

Three performance testing tools

Besides the tools that I shared throughout this article to help you with each performance-improving technique, here are three basic tools that will evaluate your site and then give you recommendations for improving it.

Pingdom Website Speed Test

pingdom

This free page test tool from Pingdom will test the speed of your website. The results will match what real users experience because the test is done with real web browsers, including Chrome, where Pingdom tests load speed, records the performance data and so on. The results will show you what about a particular page is fast, slow or too big.

pingdom example

YSlow

This Yahoo tool grades a web page based on rules for high performance pages, gives you a summary of a page’s components, shows you stats on a page, offers performance analysis tools like Smush.it and JSLint, and then gives you a summary of what you need to do to improve your page performance.

There is also a Chrome extension, which allows you to test the page speed of any website:

yahoo slow

Page Speed Insights

This is Google’s slick tool for web developers to help improve your website performance. With a simple drop of a URL into the text box and a click of a button, you’ll get your report:

page speed insights

Suggestions for performance are broken down into high, medium, low and experimental priority. This is the tool I used to come up with the recommendations above.

Conclusion

While websites get richer and cooler, page speed slows down. So, each time you are getting ready to implement a new plug-in, code or rich media, you have to ask yourself:

What is going to be the impact on page and site speed?

Sacrificing site speed to have the newest tool is probably not worth the money you may lose because of latency issues. So, until a tool proves itself as a money maker, it’s probably best to hold off.

What other ways or tools have you used to improve your site performance?

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  • 7 Cashflow killers your analytics tools are hiding from you
     
 
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Comments

  1. What is your opinion of CloudFlare as a CDN? I have them running all my sites and they promote themselves as added security and added speed. I really did not see a boost in tested speed when I switched to them.

    • Google Webmaster Tools can probably tell you if your site is faster in general. It might not be faster for you, but if it helps most users then it’s good. IMO CloudFlare is a decent budget option if you’re hosting on a slow and/or cheap host.

      • What is IMO?

      • Cloudflare works pretty well, I’ve seen an uplift on a few sites with it.

        Cloudflare and W3 total cache and on a low/medium traffic site on shared hosting and you’ll be good to go.

        • Hello. I have noticed quite a difference by using CloudFlare, but it needs to be configured to notice a difference (E.g. I am using their “Rocket Loader”) It can really help with the loading speed of your JS files (in my experience).

          I have also had allot of success using the W3 Total Cache plugin in conjunction with CloudFlare as mentioned above. Once again, W3TC is not gonna help you all that much out of the box, but if you take the time to configure it properly (just read the help files and test the different options on your site), you WILL notice a huge difference, especially in a shared hosting environment. (Actually, I’m still testing different things with my setup of W3TC such as using sub-domains for Parallelization like Neil was talking about the other day here: http://www.quicksprout.com/2013/02/07/how-i-grew-quick-sprout-from-121311-to-244923-readers-in-30-days/)

          Matter of fact, I have taken my shared hosting site from a score of 60/100 when I started all the way to 90/100 by using these two products. These test numbers are from Google’s Page Speed tool. I am quite pleased so far.

          Just my two cents…
          Regards,
          Matt

      • Google Webmaster Tools does give you some basic information on site speed. However, it doesn’t provide a lot of information and suggestions on how you can improve. Give tools like Pingdom Website Speed Test (my favorite) or YSlow and Page Speed Insights a try as suggested by Neil. :)

      • They can. If you are performing better in GWTs, then you have better chances of seeing higher rankings.

    • U need to first identify what you really want and give your self a target.

      Example. – I want any users is Usa to ping my site at 20 ms or something like that.

      then go and identify the problem area:

      Example. – My stack is running to slow. My server is located in london. Make a list.

      Then go about improing it like he mentioned in the article.

      I say this cause you are saying the cdn did not help and to me it sounds that u did not find the critical bottle neck in your application delivery.

    • I am using cloudflare and its just so great. Many security features and content optimization features they provide for free, if valued will cost thousands.

      And Neil, I think along reducing the header requests is one of the important task. Then if you are using wordpress, removing the unused ones can also give performance boost. Then if many of the plugins and your theme uses the same java librarues, then you may use google cdn to provide you with the .js files ( code.google.com ).

      I have written a post with css minification, reduction on plugins and many more.. http://blogvkp.com/increase-website-speed-5-ultimate-tips/

    • We use it for some of our software companies and it works pretty well.

    • Yeah cloudfare is good as well. I have been using MaxCDN and cloudfare and they work well in increasing speed time of my website. :)

      Thank you

  2. It’s always frustrating to vist a slow loading web page. Your recommendation will be very useful on my website. Thank you for sharing!

  3. Great list Neil! I have a site that loads quick on the front-end but on my admin panel (wordpress) it takes ages. Any idea how to fix that?

  4. Nice article but some key solutions were left out.

    1) akamai :
    More then a cdn . Has 120k servers on particaly every isp to deliver data at lan speed.

    2) Riverbed:
    Reduces chatter and uses reference log to improve application peformance. This was not mentioned.

  5. Wow, it was only this morning that I did a speed test on Pingdom and found my site was taking about 5 seconds. I did a few tweaks and now my site loads in under 2 seconds. This is an awesome tutorial explaining the entire process in details.

    Now Neil, I have not yet installed Cache plugins and stuff. if my site is loading under 2 seconds, do you think I should worry about speed?

  6. Hey Neil ,

    A very good advise on making things faster for your web.

    I am not that much into coding.I will share this post with the developers of my team. They will find it helpful.

    What I think is most useful is the List of tools that you have provided. Each section of your guidelines tell what exactly needs to be done.

  7. Great article! I’m currently working on increasing my site speed on a new site and you guide is very helpful! What is a acceptable google PageSpeed Score in your opinion?

  8. On wordpress site, also we install WP-cache now to speed up the thing http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/wp-super-cache/

    When configured properly, it’s a good help !

    • For performance testing I’d like to recommend using http://gtmetrix.com which combines recommendations from Google Pagespeed and YSlow, It also provides tips on how to make your site load faster.

      If you’re a WordPress user you can instantly improve overall performance by installing WP Super Cache, just make sure to configure it properly.

      Scripts also block parallel downloads so you should always add your scripts at the bottom of the page after most of the page html has already loaded.

    • Thank you Jp for the recommendations. I appreciate the feedback and links.

  9. Hey Neil, great post. I was just having this conversation with someone the other day. His wordpress site was running slow so I installed a cache plugin.

    Do sites that run wordpress need to inplement any of the above srategies? or will a good cache plugin take care of things?

  10. Thanks for this great article! My website is very slow at 7.3s loading time, so I need to figure out how to implement your recommendations to get it faster. I dont want visitors leaving my site because it is too slow. Thanks for sharing!

  11. I want to offer using DNS services too. They will help to reduce the DNS lookup faster than your own hosting.

  12. I’ve used the Google Page Speed Insights before but you have given me more to send my developer:) Looking forward to even faster sites… Thanks

  13. Hey Neil,

    Awesome post. Site speed is absolutely important. I find that it is the number one factor effecting bounce rate. Most people do not have the patience to wait more than a few seconds for your site to load.

    I have personally found using the google page speed tool to be amazing. I’ll have to give the other ones a try.

    If you are using wordpress, there are plenty of plugins like ewww image optimizer that help reduce the size of the images without reducing the quality.

  14. Don’t forger to disable Cache plugin+ CTRL f5 ,when you’re coding/working on your website otherwise you will see the cache
    version only you will go crazy!

  15. Sprites also make your hover buttons work properly so that there’s no delay in loading the hover image of the button.

    Every time I see this mistake it makes me cringe.

  16. Hello Neil,
    I’m interested…have you actually get increase in certain rankings after you increased site loading speed? Or it is more a future-proofing your site, as I’m sure it will be the bigger factor in the next few years…

  17. I know this is a great article but there are some things that are beyond my understanding at the moment. If I outsource this, what criteria should I use to find the right person and is there a way to check that the outsourcer has done the right thing.

    Your help would be much appreciated

  18. Nice post. However, if I want to apply most of the proposed changes to my Drupal site I would need to dig deep into my template. Which isn’t really my area of expertise.

  19. Thank you for a great article!
    I would really reccomend the GT Metrix free service: It combines reccomendations from Google Pagespeed and Yahoo Yslow and it allows you to compare several sites. Excellent tool to benchmark your site and improve performance: http://gtmetrix.com/
    It also has a WordPress plugin which is very helpfull for blogg sites.

  20. Great post am new at this , but any advice I can get to improve the speed is a plus.

    Thanks again,

  21. What an useful guide!! I never understood exactly how to measure how fast my websites were running and i always knew it was very important for the search engines. I will definitely go check all your tips and try to improve them! Thank you Neil!!! You Rock! ihih

  22. Today speed is everything, also using a server which is more powerful than required helps.

  23. Hi Neil, well produced post! One thing I have noticed is that a standard company website will run much quicker than a another company website. Why is that? Surely, if they are both hosted on the same server and each has similar content to the other they should run at approx same speed! Thanks

  24. The time taken for loading the website is the main issue everyone faces, as you said the conversion rate reduces when the site takes much time to load,The above given ideas by you i have already applied, now you have given few more tips,let me try Neil.Thanks for your sharing.

  25. I’m a complete novice with regards to page load speed. its very frustrating when you want to load a page and it take forever after around 5, 6 seconds i then give up.

    I think i’ll give these ideas a try after i have designed my site and changed the theme

  26. Great list Neil! Will definitely start looking into implementing CSS Sprites on my site. Extremely useful guide for those new to SEO.

  27. Hi Neil
    Why I haven’t meet you before?
    The things you mention in this article, no other seo news letter I have subscribed mentioned before. The way you have explained makes lots of sense. All I can say thank you to you for this moment. I heard effect of the web speed but no one did make how important for the search engines most of all for the visitors of the web site.

  28. Hello,

    My website has 10 images on the main page and its loading time, according to Pingdom, is 1.73s. I believe it is fine, what do you think, guys?

    Best Regards,
    - Harutyun.

  29. It’s always frustrating to vist a slow loading web page.

  30. In short, use torbit?

  31. Hey Neil,

    You covered all aspects , but didn’t covered a small thing.
    If we have social media share options like Facebook share, Twitter, etc.. Then it takes some time to load. In order to solve this problem add “defer tag” in javascript code. Make those social sharing buttons loads slowly and finally the site loads up super fast.

    Thank
    Suresh

  32. Hello Neil! another excellent post and certainly learned few new things especially HTML related points and some time I were having page loading speed issues but now I cleared some of them.

    Thanks for sharing such a valuable information!

  33. Thank you for your tips.
    For all my wordpress blogs I use W3 total cache plugins, it helps me a lot!

  34. Great article Neil.

    You reminded me about the pingdom tool as I kept going by default to http://webpagetest.org to do speed benchmarking. Cant say one is better than the other just yet though.

    I will definitely have a look at some of the other resources you recommend that I didn’t know about. Cheers for that!

    Paul

  35. Thanks for the great tips. I’m just wonndering if there is any method or tools to optimize external javascript codes. External JS codes really killing load time of a webpage.

  36. Hi there Neil,

    I have a question… How do you keep your pop-up subscribe form still working when having a caching plugin activated as I suspect you do. I use W3 total cache, which is great but still want the pop-up. From what I remember you also now use W3?

  37. Hey neil thanks for the well detailed and informative post….i always wondered what does the terms really mean and how to do those task suggestion in the google page insights…..will implement these all now and will use cdn as well :)

  38. does the new google code consider speed also?

  39. i think penguin considers how fast a site loads? how does it make sense for seo?

  40. Users hate to wait for a website to load thus exiting and you will end up losing valuable customer. The above mentioned post written by you gives useful information on how to avoid this particular situation thus enlightening me on improving the website speed. Will surely start and follow your tips while creating my website.

  41. Caching is extremely useful for cutting down website speed. Good thing most cms solutions like wordpress and drupal have it built in.

  42. Lots of interesting tips – i had never heard of CDNs but I’ll look in to them now.

  43. i cleared some of my issues, thanx Neil

  44. Neil, would you recommend W3 Total Cache or WP Super Cache for WordPress? I’m thinking about running a test and doing a write up, interested on your thoughts.

  45. Also I use a cache plugin in my WordPress based website, its: WP Super Cache and it is a lot faster. Apparently the DB queries are faster (cached)

  46. I find those figures shocking- I didn’t know that site speed had such an effect on conversion rate! Thanks for adding yet again to my knowledge Neil.

  47. Why do webmasters persist in using those annoying flash animation things that take ages to load? They’re a total turnoff – a triumph of style over business sense.

  48. i dont seem to ever be able to improve my sites speed , its always a minimum of 13 seconds… :(

  49. Thats a lot of tweaks. The loadtime depends on the type of server too and i think the mention of W3total cache plugin would add to the fire considering most of the websites are in wordpress now. It really made a difference and the load time is 3-4 seconds from 11 seconds :)

  50. Great information, quite technical though. Are CDNs somewhat similar to server locations of hosting plan? Some webhost providers have servers located in Hongkong, for instance, so that users in the Philippines can access the site through the HK server for faster loading time.

  51. Its a very great post…I liked it and use ot for developing better and FASTER websites….

    I think the kind of hosting plays an important role…

    I am confused wether the geographic location of your Web Hosting Server affects the speed of a website loading???

    Any one’s expertise is welcomed….

    • It does. If your server is in California, but someone in England is trying to pull up your site, it would load slower than if someone in California tried pulling up your site.

  52. definitely a slow loading website will lose its visitors and may be a customer. these are the great tips neil regarding a fast website.
    i like it very much.
    thanks.
    Matt

  53. Thank you on the very comprehensive post. I am quite new in this and will definitely go through the links, checking and improving my website speed. Once again, you are really very kindly helpful :-)

  54. I have been dealing with page speed for weeks now.
    Never heard of Sprites. I am trying it now! Thanks Neil

  55. Recently I have enabled Cloudflare and mod_pagespeed on my dreamhost server.And I could see better improvement in my blog loading time.
    Thanks for the Informative post.

  56. Really nice blog post – these kind of tools really are invaluable for getting under the bonnet and seeing just where and what elements of your site are slowing it down. I’d also recommend StatusCake.com’s tool which to me feels a nice alternative to Pingdoms – https://www.statuscake.com/tools/ :)

  57. Thanks for the insightful tips and I am actually applying most of these tips on my new blog site to increase the loading speed.

  58. A colleague of mine told me that we can cut loading time by putting css and img files in a parallel subdomain.

    If you don’t mind, can you explain to me how that works, and how it will cut our website loading time? Thanks :)

  59. Hello!,,,,
    Awesome post. Site speed is absolutely important. I find that it is the number one factor effecting bounce rate. Most people do not have the patience to wait more than a few seconds for your site to load.

    Thanks,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

  60. Neil, is there value in only making the homepage fast if the rest of the site is still slow? We have a very large e-commerce site and will be focusing on overall page speed in the future but wondered if there is benefit to attacking the main page immediately.

    Thanks!

  61. thanks a lot for all these very helpful informations :)

  62. Another great article. I myself actually did most of this recently and it does make a huge difference.

    Server Caching, image resizing and a few of the areas above make the load speed shoot down.

  63. tq admin for the info but i am confused how to use sprite tools or service. Anyway i just submitted application to use pagespeed tools provided by google. Hope it works. Thanks if it wasnt you wouldnt have known.

  64. Great post Neil.

    I’m always kind of surprised at how much time people put into reducing their load time while still hosting their blog or website on a really ordinary hosting company.

    Surely a good VPS or cloud host is the best place to start?

    Ramsay

  65. I would like to improve my website speed. Anyone can help to improve it dramatically? all your feedback is really important and will play key part in improving overall user experience.

    Thanks Everyone

  66. Nice blog. If you always attach positive emotions to the things you want, and never attach negative emotions to the things you don’t, then that which you desire most will invariably come your way. Please do keep up the awesome job. Great blog!

    The Tembusu

  67. Hi Neil,
    What advice could you give for a photography blog like my own which needs to show many photos? Lazy Loader type plugins tend to annoy users as they end up having to wait for each image anyway. I am currently using Amazon’s CDN, but my page is still slow as hell :(

    Thanks, Mark

  68. As we learned in the past couple of years, Google really is pushing on faster loading sites, especially for mobile so their rule is 4 seconds or less. The less the load, the better the ranking.

    A CDN like MaxCDN can definitely held offload the server, especially if you have an image heavy site. It doesn’t always mean you’ll see a huge decrease in page load time, but your server will be able to do more thing to help with that.

    Be aware that MaxCDN has done away with their pay as you go method and it’s now subscription based per month.

    • Curt, thanks for providing everyone with such valuable tips. You are right on point: over the past few years Google has placed a greater emphasis on how quickly your site loads. It’s all about speed!

  69. Great Post :). Thanks for your thought share.

    I agree your whole point but some site owners install jquery. Affected loading speed for jquery.

    So, any tips to slove ?

    • Steve, glad I could help. Site speed is one of the most important factors people overlook. As for tips, nothing now. Let me know if you have any specific questions and I’ll be sure to answer them :)

  70. Thanks Sir ! appreciate it . I have implemented this in my site , can you please take a look .

  71. Thanks Neil for the great information. I run a video based website and having good loading speed is very important for me. I was looking for ways which help me to increase website speed. I have already used number of ways like file compression, decrease code size, optimize images and css etc…but i could not see any respectable change in my website speed. The ways you have given here look effective. But before going through them i would like to know that how much impact these methods have on website speed. Great tips, Neil.

    • Toby, all of the factors you mentioned have an immense impact on website speed. It’s all about utilizing all of these tactics to come up with a site that is user friendly and loads quicker than the rest. Please let me know if you need help with anything at all :)

  72. Thanks Neil for your reply. If you say these factors put immense impact on website speed then i should go through them once again.

  73. LOL i mean “laughing on lap” nice solid article for collecting page speed as an introduction. There is also gtmetrix.com that integrates Yslow, and pagespeed grading aspects. I found webpagetest.org to be of a lot of use because I could compare my site to others at a relative distance to where there server is, and mine is situated. The greatest tool for knowledge building especially in the web design, and marketing industry is Google… use it wisely :D

  74. interesting blog. It was an interesting read and I look forward to more like this from you soon.

  75. Hell?, I enjoy reading ?ll of y?ur article.
    I wanted to write a littl? comment too support y?u.

  76. thank you for your helpful information, i will try this in my site.. :)

  77. But what about those beginners or simply a blogger, who’s not a developer there is no any step by step guide that? what tools they use, how to find out the code from edit html or codes and how to compress or edit?? nothing like that? :-(

    • The CloudFlare CDN is super easy to set-up and will give you massive speed improvements which will greatly improve many of the parameters Neil mentions in this article. There is even a free version.
      Other CDN’s are great too, but from experience, I know how easy CloudFlare is to implement; and no, I don’t work for them.
      Also, by blogger, if you’re talking about Google’s Blogger platform, it works with that as well, but you’ll probably first want to map your “blogspot” URL over to your own custom domain name for better overall control.

  78. Amazing tips. Thanks for sharing

  79. Great article will apply this points on my blog

    Thanks

  80. To properly configure compression, and overall increase website performance, my personal advice is to install mod_pagespeed Apache module, then tune MySQL server settings for best performance. Also you can install a PHP opcode caching plugin, like Zend Optimizer+ to ultimately speed things. You can use http://www.getpagespeed.com/ service to easily achieve all that :)

  81. This inspired me to tinker with my site, which lead me to bring the load time from a snail-paced 5 seconds to a way more glorious load time of .9 seconds according to Pingdom. http://webpagetest.org is also a great tool for finding out which files are taking a long time to load, and eliminating or offsetting them. I found a lot of junk files too, this way, that I could simply leave out. Minify helped a lot too.

    The biggest help overall, though, was simply making my Vimeo video be a PNG image, which then when clicked would load the video in a modal. That alone shaved 3 seconds off the load time.

    Thanks, Neil!

  82. Very information article, Neil. Thank you.

    Could you please clarify one data point? The “40% of people will abandon a site if it takes longer than three seconds to load” stat doesn’t jive with the “Patience of Mobile Web Users” section of the infographic which indicates that after five seconds you will have lost only 19% of your visitors (3% + 16%). Is this difference because the former data is based on e-commerce users and the latter for mobile users?

  83. Hello very cool site!! Man .. Beautiful .. Amazing .. I’ll bookmark your website and take the feeds additionally?
    I am happy to search out a lot of useful info here within the publish, we’d like work out more techniques in this regard, thank you for sharing.
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  84. Informative blog for me.I like reading this. Keep sharing.

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